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Re: [existlist] Sartre's influences

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  • eduardathome
    Depends upon what is meant by socialist . I think that European countries had a long history of socialism. I think that it was only in the US that the idea
    Message 1 of 43 , Jun 2, 2013
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      Depends upon what is meant by "socialist". I think that European countries
      had a long history of socialism. I think that it was only in the US that
      the idea of everyone for themselves is a political philosophy at least until
      Obama. Granted there is a history of farmers organizations and a farmer
      labour party going back the end of WW1 [1918].

      eduard

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Mary
      Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2013 1:44 PM
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [existlist] Sartre's influences

      I think two of the profoundest influences on him were his Alsatian heritage
      and German philosophy. He was tutored at his German speaking grandfather's
      knee. And although France wasn't Socialist until after de Gaulle, his
      attention to Kojeve definitely also had a significant influence on his
      philosophy.Camus argued that only Nietzsche had managed to escape the cold
      northern German influences and embraced the "solar" thought and aesthetic of
      the Mediterranean. Sartre adopted Marxist ideology via the German idealists.

      Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome <yeoman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Simply that he is French might be an influence. This is just a
      > supposition,
      > but I should think that French society which is more socialist would be an
      > influence that produces a Sartre. Granted, a particular philosopher may
      > be
      > a person who is atypical to their overall environment, although still
      > influenced by their immediate environment.
      >
      > I latched onto Charles Bukowski this morning in reading a Montreal
      > newspaper. You could say that he represents a certain philosophy in his
      > books and that he is significantly a product of his upbringing. Jack
      > Kerouac would be another example.
      >
      > eduard
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Mary
      > Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 6:38 PM
      > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [existlist] Re: more nothing
      >
      > Okay then. The influences for these concepts go back to Parmenides in the
      > 5th century B.C. These concepts have been carried forward until today.
      > They
      > continue to be discussed among Hegelian scholars at the very least.
      > Sartre's
      > philosophical influences were other philosophers. Not everyone who
      > experienced the cultural and historical influences that Sartre did became
      > philosophers. So other than his personal influences of childhood,
      > attending
      > university for his philosophy degree, his war experiences, and his
      > teaching
      > philosophy, I'm not sure how you wish to make a connection between
      > non-philosophical influences and his book. Which other particular
      > influences
      > have you uncovered?
      >
      > Mary
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome <yeoman@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Both. Being and Nothingness is Sartre's book.
      > >
      > > eduard
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Mary
      > > Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 12:35 PM
      > > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [existlist] Re: more nothing
      > >
      > > eduard,
      > >
      > > Are you referring to the concepts of Being and Nothingness or
      > > specifically
      > > to Sartre's book?
      > >
      > > Mary
      > >
      > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome <yeoman@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Yet I think that there were particular influences that lead to Being and
      > > Nothingness.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • eduardathome
      Although it isn’t a philosophy but only a tool, there are a ton of influences which lead to Nooism. The primary influence, however, was the brain surgery I
      Message 43 of 43 , Jun 2, 2013
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        Although it isn’t a philosophy but only a tool, there are a ton of influences which lead to Nooism. The primary influence, however, was the brain surgery I underwent when I was in my early 40s.

        In any case, I don’t think that one can truly engage a philosopher X’s ideas without some understanding of the influences. I don’t see it otherwise. Why Sartre came up with Being and Nothingness is as important as the philosophy itself.

        eduard

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jim
        Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2013 2:12 PM
        To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [existlist] Re: Sartre's influences

        Mary - I believe the major philosophical influence on "Being and Nothingness" was Heidegger's "Being and Time". Sartre, I believe, studied this work closely before writing his own magnum opus.


        Sartre takes over some of Heidegger's ideas wholesale like "existence precedes essence". The early Sartre was more existentialist, the later Sartre was more Marxist.

        Eduard - I worry that a concern over the question "What were the influences on philosopher X?" is often a substitute for directly engaging with philosopher X's ideas and claims.

        Should I be more concerned to understand and grapple with your Philosophy of Nooism? Or should I be more concerned to uncover the influences on you which resulted in your personal philosophy?

        Jim




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