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Understanding Sartre

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  • Mary
    For those who have read or plan to read Thomas R. Flynn s Existentialism: A Very Short Introduction there is also a page he authored at the Stanford
    Message 1 of 4 , May 28, 2013
      For those who have read or plan to read Thomas R. Flynn's "Existentialism: A Very Short Introduction" there is also a page he authored at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy that is quite accessible to the average reader, such as myself. I've often resorted to such helpful overviews and commentaries over the years. I personally cannot get into Sartre's more phenomenological texts, preferring his essays and plays. I've not enjoyed his novels; Camus' writing is much warmer.

      http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sartre/

      Mary
    • Doug Viener
      Sartre s Existentialism is a Humanism is very easy read to get the just of his philosophy Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
      Message 2 of 4 , May 28, 2013
        Sartre's Existentialism is a Humanism is very easy read to get the just of his philosophy

        Sent from my iPhone

        On May 28, 2013, at 3:05 PM, "Mary" <josephson45r@...> wrote:

        > For those who have read or plan to read Thomas R. Flynn's "Existentialism: A Very Short Introduction" there is also a page he authored at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy that is quite accessible to the average reader, such as myself. I've often resorted to such helpful overviews and commentaries over the years. I personally cannot get into Sartre's more phenomenological texts, preferring his essays and plays. I've not enjoyed his novels; Camus' writing is much warmer.
        >
        > http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sartre/
        >
        > Mary
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • hermit crab
        I started reading Booky Wook 2 a day or so ago and see that Russell Brand (before Part One begins) quoted Kafka: Don t bend; don t water it down; don t try to
        Message 3 of 4 , May 28, 2013
          I started reading Booky Wook 2 a day or so ago and see that Russell Brand
          (before Part One begins) quoted Kafka:

          "Don't bend; don't water it down; don't try to make it logical; don't edit
          your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense
          obsessions mercilessly."

          Followed by this Sarte quote:

          "If I became a philosopher, if I have so keenly sought this fame for which
          I'm still waiting, it's all been to seduce women basically."

          Hmmm, honesty like that is rare, eh Doug? <g>

          h.


          On Tue, May 28, 2013 at 5:35 PM, Doug Viener <duditz72@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Sartre's Existentialism is a Humanism is very easy read to get the just of
          > his philosophy
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
          > On May 28, 2013, at 3:05 PM, "Mary" <josephson45r@...> wrote:
          >
          > > For those who have read or plan to read Thomas R. Flynn's
          > "Existentialism: A Very Short Introduction" there is also a page he
          > authored at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy that is quite
          > accessible to the average reader, such as myself. I've often resorted to
          > such helpful overviews and commentaries over the years. I personally cannot
          > get into Sartre's more phenomenological texts, preferring his essays and
          > plays. I've not enjoyed his novels; Camus' writing is much warmer.
          > >
          > > http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sartre/
          > >
          > > Mary
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • christopher arthur
          Oddly, I also read a quote once in reference to Sartre s existentialism, and it was something like voluptuousness is a battle that no one wins ... [Non-text
          Message 4 of 4 , May 28, 2013
            Oddly, I also read a quote once in reference to Sartre's existentialism,
            and it was something like "voluptuousness is a battle that no one wins"

            On 5/28/2013 6:25 PM, hermit crab wrote:
            >
            > I started reading Booky Wook 2 a day or so ago and see that Russell Brand
            > (before Part One begins) quoted Kafka:
            >
            > "Don't bend; don't water it down; don't try to make it logical; don't edit
            > your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense
            > obsessions mercilessly."
            >
            > Followed by this Sarte quote:
            >
            > "If I became a philosopher, if I have so keenly sought this fame for which
            > I'm still waiting, it's all been to seduce women basically."
            >
            > Hmmm, honesty like that is rare, eh Doug? <g>
            >
            > h.
            >
            > On Tue, May 28, 2013 at 5:35 PM, Doug Viener <duditz72@...
            > <mailto:duditz72%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > Sartre's Existentialism is a Humanism is very easy read to get the
            > just of
            > > his philosophy
            > >
            > > Sent from my iPhone
            > >
            > > On May 28, 2013, at 3:05 PM, "Mary" <josephson45r@...
            > <mailto:josephson45r%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
            > >
            > > > For those who have read or plan to read Thomas R. Flynn's
            > > "Existentialism: A Very Short Introduction" there is also a page he
            > > authored at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy that is quite
            > > accessible to the average reader, such as myself. I've often resorted to
            > > such helpful overviews and commentaries over the years. I personally
            > cannot
            > > get into Sartre's more phenomenological texts, preferring his essays and
            > > plays. I've not enjoyed his novels; Camus' writing is much warmer.
            > > >
            > > > http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/sartre/
            > > >
            > > > Mary
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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