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Re: The Sunset Limited

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  • Mary
    h. Thanks for this critique. I found it also here and notice the author, William Quirk whom you ve quoted, also makes comparisons with Beckett and Kafka. Since
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 7, 2013
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      h.

      Thanks for this critique. I found it also here and notice the author, William Quirk whom you've quoted, also makes comparisons with Beckett and Kafka. Since I'm more familiar with Camus I thought of how the play's themes contrast with his absurd 'logic' . . . will read more closely once I find the time. I've dug up an old box filled with research on a project which I put aside about 10 years ago, and it's absorbing my reading time.

      http://journals.tdl.org/cormacmccarthy/index.php/cormacmccarthy/article/view/2236/1928

      Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "existlist" <hermitcrab65@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Yes, I felt optimistic during both the coffee and meal.
      >
      >
      > ===
      > Mary,
      > Here's an Apollonian-Dionysian reading of The Sunset Limited :
      >
      > When contextualized with Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy, however, The Sunset Limited, becomes a stranger, richer text, such that we can profitably call it a "minimalist tragedy," since the play contains many elements that, on a reduced scale, correspond to Nietzsche's theory of tragedy. A brief recapitulation of the Apollonian and Dionysian will be helpful here. According to the young German philologist, Greek tragedy develops out of the tension between two artistic drives, the Apollonian and the Dionysian, whose primary artistic manifestations are, respectively, sculpture with its orientation around beautiful appearances, and music with its call to song, dance and the fullest enjoyment of the senses. In the phenomenon of Greek tragedy, produced by the interplay of these artistic drives, the tragic hero is the representative of the Apollonian state of individuation. When in the course of the drama it becomes clear that individuation is a source of suffering, the tragic hero is destroyed. This destruction is joyous, however, because it means the "Apollonian" individual returns to the original unity of all being ("das Ur-Eine"), which is the Dionysian state and its intoxicated, musical jubilation. The chorus in Greek tragedy represents the Dionysian unity, and in his or her downfall the tragic hero rejoins that unity masked as the chorus.
      > http://www.scribd.com/doc/100812647/%E2%80%9CMinimalist-Tragedy%E2%80%9C-Nietzschean-Thought-in-McCarthy%E2%80%99s-The-Sunset-Limited
      >
      > ===
      > Now I'm wondering about this "das Ur-Eine" and how it compares to simply 'waking up'.
      >
      > It sounds suspiciously like enlightenment in the nondual traditions.
      >
      > http://jacketmagazine.com/34/stephens-narcissus.shtml
      > the perspective of "primal being" — "das Ur-Eine" — which uses the human consciousness as a mirror in which it may view its own reflection, and this perspective is free from the constraints of historical time
      >
      > h.
      >
    • existlist
      ... === Thanks for the link. I will read it carefully. h.
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 8, 2013
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        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@...> wrote:
        >
        > h.
        >
        > Thanks for this critique. I found it also here and notice the author, William Quirk whom you've quoted, also makes comparisons with Beckett and Kafka. Since I'm more familiar with Camus I thought of how the play's themes contrast with his absurd 'logic' . . . will read more closely once I find the time. I've dug up an old box filled with research on a project which I put aside about 10 years ago, and it's absorbing my reading time.
        >
        > http://journals.tdl.org/cormacmccarthy/index.php/cormacmccarthy/article/view/2236/1928
        >
        > Mary


        ===
        Thanks for the link. I will read it carefully.

        h.
      • hermit crab
        Oh, I see now, Mary, that your link was the same text by William Quirk that I sent. I reread it anyway. Interesting stuff. Here s William Quirk:
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 8, 2013
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          Oh, I see now, Mary, that your link was the same text by William Quirk that
          I sent.
          I reread it anyway. Interesting stuff.
          Here's William Quirk: http://www.american.edu/cas/faculty/quirk.cfm
          And I see he has a special interest in neopragmatist Richard Rorty which
          spurred a quick google:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neopragmatism
          There are endless ideas to explore. I guess as long as one realizes that
          they are all just that...ideas...and not taken too seriously, all is well.
          It's just good fun.

          h.

          " <josephson45r@...> wrote


          :h


          > > Thanks for this critique. I found it also here and notice the author,
          > William Quirk whom you've quoted, also makes comparisons with Beckett and
          > Kafka. Since I'm more familiar with Camus I thought of how the play's
          > themes contrast with his absurd 'logic' . . . will read more closely once I
          > find the time. I've dug up an old box filled with research on a project
          > which I put aside about 10 years ago, and it's absorbing my reading time.
          > >
          > >
          > http://journals.tdl.org/cormacmccarthy/index.php/cormacmccarthy/article/view/2236/1928
          > >
          > > Mary
          >
          > ===
          > Thanks for the link. I will read it carefully.
          >
          > h.
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mary
          I disagree with what you ve expressed here. There are different classes of ideas, some of which should be taken seriously. I suppose it s up to each of us to
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 9, 2013
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            I disagree with what you've expressed here. There are different classes of ideas, some of which should be taken seriously. I suppose it's up to each of us to determine distinguish between which ones are simply fun and others which are a matter of life and death.

            Mary

            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, hermit crab <hermitcrab65@...> wrote:

            > There are endless ideas to explore. I guess as long as one realizes that
            > they are all just that...ideas...and not taken too seriously, all is well.
            > It's just good fun.
            >
            > h.
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