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Re: [existlist] Re: The Two Tragedies in life?

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  • eduardathome
    I can appreciate that Oscar Wilde said it for affect. But that doesn t change my point. If it were thought that the awareness of Wilde was necessary to
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 23, 2013
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      I can appreciate that Oscar Wilde said it for affect. But that doesn't
      change my point. If it were thought that the awareness of Wilde was
      necessary to illuminate the meaning, then why not do that in the first place
      instead of keeping the author secret. I took the saying as it was presented
      and as such it was just plain silly. You yourself commented that the two
      experiences are not necessarily "tragic".

      Do you recall ... "It is that which was said which is under question, not
      the personal habits of the speaker of them." So why bring up the speaker
      now?? In your post you carry on about how the saying is not true. I just
      went the extra step of making the assessment that it was childish, as it
      undoubtedly is.

      eduard



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Dick.
      Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 10:26 PM
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [existlist] Re: The Two Tragedies in life?


      The person who said it was Oscar Wilde, far better well known and read
      than you or I. His life experience was plainly very different from
      yours or mine. But he was hardly an inexperienced young fool. Had you
      pumped the saying into the search engine you would have found out who it
      was soon enough. His gift and eloquence in writing was phenomenal.
      Don't think you could equal it.

      As for the other email in which you claim `only an expression'
      then it is often the case especially young people can take expressions
      seriously. But it is just as easy to say what you actually mean. Look
      how seriously most Yanks take the Bible :- ))) And hundreds of
      expressions in daily life originate from that bloody stupid book. N.B. I
      don't need to be told what and what not to take seriously and
      `worry' about thanks. Been around too much and too long to get
      knickers into a twist.

      rwr



      -- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduardathome wrote:
      >
      > The person who asked that question and chose to use the word "tragedy"
      > therein shows that he/she is completely disconnected from the real
      world.
      > Or perhaps as a spoilt child who has yet to enter the world and isn't
      aware
      > of what tragedy is. I can think of a whole lot of other stuff which
      would
      > qualify as tragedy which is other than not getting what you want and
      getting
      > what you want.
      >
      > eduard
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Dick.
      > Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 6:27 AM
      > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [existlist] The Two Tragedies in life?
      >
      >
      > The Two Tragedies in life?
      >
      > There are two tragedies in life (so I have heard it said). One is not
      > getting what you want; and the other is getting it. Claimed to have
      been
      > said by somebody who was accused of being a homo sexual. Maybe he was
      > and maybe he wasn't. But so what? It is that which was said which is
      > under question, not the personal habits of the speaker of them. Is it
      > true that there are only two tragedies in life? And is it true as to
      > what was said above regarding what they are? How do you find it?
      >
      > Have you ever acquired something which you really wanted, and if so
      did
      > you find the acquisition of it to be tragic? Can't say that I found
      > it to be tragic. So not true in my case. Mind you there was not a lot
      > which I ever wanted to have. And I got more than I ever wanted for. He
      > failed to mention however that the chase for something which you want
      > can also be an unexpected pleasant joy and an exciting task in itself.
      >
      > Neither did he seem to go into the question of how one is sure of
      > knowing what one really wants. If you acquire something which you
      really
      > wanted and then find the acquisition of it to be tragic then surely
      you
      > did not really want that thing and it was not really what you were
      > looking for, and then you go looking for something else. Which in
      itself
      > can become a giddy spiral. But not wanting much seems to eliminate
      such
      > a spiral being set up in the first place. We certainly come into this
      > world in need of a few things, for we come into this world helpless.
      But
      > do we come into this world wanting things? So, when does wanting
      things
      > come onto the scene and how? You see something then the I want it may
      > kick in. But most of the things we need cannot be seen. Can somebody
      > want something before they experience the existence of that thing?
      >
      > But either way I personally always found it to be reasonable to ask
      > oneself why is the thing which is wanted, wanted? And then to analyse
      > that feeling. Chew on it for a few days then you might find that you
      > don't really want it at all. And in which case it will save
      > fruitless labour and time in chasing after it. And then of course
      there
      > is the bit about things just coming and then wow! What do you really
      > really want? I know that I need air to breath, but I do not want for
      it,
      > for it is already there. Many have told me that they want to be loved.
      > Well, OK, fine. But why do they want to be loved? What will it do for
      > them?
      >
      > Some say that it would make them feel `whole'. But if so then
      > they must be feeling to be not whole. So how did they get like that?
      > What went missing? When, why and how did it go missing? I felt that
      > there was something missing when I was very small. Some answers. For
      it
      > was self evident that I was full of questions. I knew that I was
      > ignorant. And that was a fortuitous find. Hence some looking for
      answers
      > kicked in. It struck me that it was totally idiotic that something
      could
      > know that it exists yet not know what it is and where it came from and
      > why it exists. When a few answers came (not many of them but just a
      few)
      > then I certainly did not find the acquisition of them to be tragic.
      But
      > in my experience I found there to be far more than two tragedies on
      this
      > world. So, I cannot agree with the very `clever' gentleman at
      > all.
      >
      > rwr
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
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