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Excess pride

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  • Mary
    Reading with fresh eyes this morning, I see paradox in the Nietzsche quote. He bemoans present knowledge while imagining future knowledge. He can t escape his
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 9, 2012
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      Reading with fresh eyes this morning, I see paradox in the Nietzsche quote. He bemoans present knowledge while imagining future knowledge. He can't escape his own thought or recognize that it might reflect the attributes he applies to other human thought. All too human is an excess; there is always something left over, a remainder to be recollected, sublated, and anticipated. Human animal nature is not purer than human intellect.

      The will to reclaim a previous nature or to release some dormant repressed nature itself indicates an inevitable passage into something new. There is no turning back. We're stuck with reason, and the task of those who accept this, is to study it with no less vigor than speculative science. Those who wish to manipulate it or control with it will find thought as wild as any lion. Human pride is not more hubristic than a lion's pride.

      To regret man's power to destroy the planet points to a recollection yet to come. Who can do that?

      Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@...> wrote:

      Nietzsche's comment from "On Truth
      and Lie in a Nonmoral Sense" (1873) for consideration:

      "In some remote corner of the sprawling universe, twinkling among the countless
      solar systems, there was once a star on which some clever animals invented
      knowledge. It was the most arrogant, most mendacious minute in 'world history,'
      but it was only a minute. After nature caught its breath a little, the star
      froze, and the clever animals had to die. -- One could invent a fable like this
      and still not have illustrated sufficiently how miserable, how shadowy and
      fleeting, how aimless and arbitrary the human intellect appears in nature. There
      were eternities in which it did not exist, and when it has vanished once again,
      it will have left nothing in its wake. For the human intellect has no further
      task beyond human life. Instead, it is merely human, and only its owner and
      producer regards it so pathetically as to suppose that it contains in itself the
      hinge on which the world turns."
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