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Re: [existlist] Re: Buddhism and Nihilism (was "The phenomenology of evil")

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  • tom
    Jim Of course, so much depends on our semantics. To a certain extent, an anti religion can be considered in many ways a religion itself. I suspect that
    Message 1 of 38 , May 31, 2011
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      Jim

      Of course, so much depends on our semantics. To a certain extent, an anti religion can be considered in many ways a religion itself. I suspect that religions often emerge from new groups that reject the traditional religions as overly legalistic and ritualistic. I suspect this was true of Buddhism in relation to Hinduism, as well as Christianity in relation to Judism. Didn't Nietzsche say Christ was the only Christian? Carl Jung said "I am glad I am not a Jungian, because I can change my mind." I suspect in the early days, religions often tend to be vehicles of self empowerment and awareness;but in time by necesity ally themselves with the political and economic powers and become means of control of the masses by the elites.There is usually a major transition when a religion or school of thought goes from underground to the dogma of the state. When they wewre underground. Christians were often thrown to the lions, but in a few years after Catholicism had become the state religion, they were burning gnostics. A similar fate occured in Marxism going from an underground artsy intellectual thing to the state dogma in Russia etc.

      Peace
      Tom

      Peace
      Tom
      ----- Original Message -----

      Peace
      Tom
      From: Jim
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 12:02 PM
      Subject: [existlist] Re: Buddhism and Nihilism (was "The phenomenology of evil")



      Tom,

      Yes, your characterisations of both how science works and how religions can help individuals develop their characters in positive ways ring true.

      However I don't think Nietzsche recognized this positive aspect of the religious tradition.

      Jim





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mary
      Jim, As I wade through Zizek s How To Read Lacan, I also find this piece helpful. I realize it s a backward process to read Hegel, Lacan, and Marx through
      Message 38 of 38 , Jun 8, 2011
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        Jim,

        As I wade through Zizek's How To Read Lacan, I also find this piece helpful. I realize it's a backward process to read Hegel, Lacan, and Marx through Zizek, but it's where I am. Here's another link for you.

        http://www.lacan.com/zizekchro1.htm

        I'm discovering a rich philosophical history behind socialism and delighted to regard Zizek as 'continuing' the work of Sartre.

        Mary

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jjimstuart1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mary,
        >
        > Thanks for that. Reading a couple of paragraphs of Zizek makes me want to read more. In particular I would need to read more about the "original monstrous cut / excess" before I felt ready to comment on Zizek's thought in this area.
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