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Re: [existlist] Re: The phenomenology of evil

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  • Herman
    Hi Mary and all, ... I think it is a giant step in the denouement of the philosophese that passes as ethical discourse to see the role that aversion plays in
    Message 1 of 38 , May 26, 2011
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      Hi Mary and all,

      On 27 May 2011 06:39, Mary <josephson45r@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jjimstuart1@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I don't think I'll be reading the three books you mention in the
      > foreseeable future, but I do intend to return to Zizek before long, so we
      > may be able to get back to discussing him.
      >
      > Jim,
      >
      > I look forward to this--since impersonal evil is so plausibly deniable--
      > and also any comments from Wil regarding his selections. I find the numbing
      > facticity of evil in Cormac McCarthy's "Bood Meridian" and Roberto Bolano's
      > "2666" as nauseating as some Americans' obsession with murder and forensics,
      > especially while we're inadvertently complicit in the suffering and death of
      > others. I have an aversion to both kinds of evil; not very philosophical, I
      > know.
      >


      I think it is a giant step in the denouement of the philosophese that passes
      as ethical discourse to see the role that aversion plays in the
      characterisation of evil. Aversion well precedes the philosophical and the
      philosophese, Mary; there's nothing wrong with that, it is the way things
      are. I just continue to wonder what additional value you see in discussing
      in terms of high level concepts like evil when suffering, death and aversion
      are such palpable realities.

      Like you, I also look forward to others sharing their readings of certain
      fellow travellers on the subject. I intend to bury myself in FN's "Beyond
      Good and Evil" for a while, and hope at some time to be able to contrast it
      with the Buddhist perspective.


      Cheers


      Herman


      Mary
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mary
      Jim, As I wade through Zizek s How To Read Lacan, I also find this piece helpful. I realize it s a backward process to read Hegel, Lacan, and Marx through
      Message 38 of 38 , Jun 8, 2011
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        Jim,

        As I wade through Zizek's How To Read Lacan, I also find this piece helpful. I realize it's a backward process to read Hegel, Lacan, and Marx through Zizek, but it's where I am. Here's another link for you.

        http://www.lacan.com/zizekchro1.htm

        I'm discovering a rich philosophical history behind socialism and delighted to regard Zizek as 'continuing' the work of Sartre.

        Mary

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <jjimstuart1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Mary,
        >
        > Thanks for that. Reading a couple of paragraphs of Zizek makes me want to read more. In particular I would need to read more about the "original monstrous cut / excess" before I felt ready to comment on Zizek's thought in this area.
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