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RE: [existlist] Re: existentialism

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  • Eduard Alf
    Ryan, There is still a lot in Existentialism which is of value. I just feel that there is so much that is open to us now, and that we should adopt a positive
    Message 1 of 275 , Jan 4, 2002
      Ryan,

      There is still a lot in Existentialism which is of value. I just feel that
      there is so much that is open to us now, and that we should adopt a positive
      attitude towards life and society. Sartre and Camus had their problems and
      a lot of it had to do with their experiences. But then the 1940s and 50s
      were hard on everyone, especially the Europeans. But Hell is not other
      people. It may be some of the other people, but not all. There is a lot of
      good in this world, but if you are looking for the bad, you will surely find
      it.

      eduard
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Roggles457@... [mailto:Roggles457@...]
      Sent: Friday, January 04, 2002 12:56 AM
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [existlist] Re: existentialism


      In regards to an opinion I have heard repeatedly from many people, I wish
      to
      make a few thoughts. Many people claim that Sartre's (and Camus, to a
      certain extent) philosophy extended merely from the Dark era of WWII.
      While
      I would perhaps agree that did heavily influence his philosophy, I do not
      believe existentialism is merely another relic of the past age, a
      "stepping
      stone to a new age", as Eduard put it. In the United States, if anything,
      the symptoms of Sartre's dark outlook, the desolation and loneliness, are
      becoming even worse than they were during the WWII period. Ask any
      psychologist, and they will likely say people are exhibiting more of these
      feelings than ever before.
      Continuing on the branch of thought, I could not help but think of an
      early section of the Will to Power, by an early semi-existentialist,
      Friedrich Nietzsche, about the decadence of societies, leading to the
      dehumanization and mass-mentality. As he listed the criteria for these
      decadent societies, I could not help but realize these were precisely the
      things the U.S. was becoming notorious for.
      To call Existentialism a relic from the past is a common claim, and
      one
      that I understand the origins of to a degree. But while the philosophers
      themselves may have been influenced by the times, most of what people like
      Sartre were saying still applies today.

      Ryan

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    • mary.jo11
      Also, Fathers and Sons by Turgenev, and Todd Olivier s biography of Camus. Mary
      Message 275 of 275 , Jan 4, 2008
        Also, Fathers and Sons by Turgenev, and Todd Olivier's biography of
        Camus.

        Mary
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