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Re: [existlist] The initial moves in a Chess game

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  • tom
    You wrote Improvement is made by getting less wrong. Just as in real life. George Soros attributes the ability to become aware of his mistakes and to correct
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 27, 2011
      You wrote

      Improvement is made by getting less wrong. Just as in real life.

      George Soros attributes the ability to become aware of his mistakes and to correct them as the reason for his wealth.

      Tom


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: rwr
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, January 27, 2011 4:29 AM
      Subject: [existlist] The initial moves in a Chess game




      The initial moves in a Chess game

      There is an old wise dictum in chess - Never move a piece twice
      until you have moved them all once. This of course can never be
      applied, even though it is a good dictum as a general rule of thumb. It
      is ALL about the PROMPT and SOUND development of your pieces.

      You will notice that any chess piece can move to more squares if it is
      placed in the centre of the board, as opposed to its lack of potential
      if placed on the edge of the board. Hence more POWER in the centre of
      the board. Notice that the centre of the board contains four squares: d4
      d5 e4 and e5. Thus the opening procedure is to try and dominate these
      four squares and later to establish pieces there. Remember also that the
      best form of defence is to ATTACK. But that attack has to be based on a
      sound foundation whilst not ignoring self defence.

      The general rule of opening moves thence is to get the two centre Pawns
      out and then develop first the Knights and the Bishops and then get the
      King castled into a safe place; preferably on the Kings side of the
      board. Notation for the castling move is 0-0 for castling Kings side and
      0-0-0 for castling Queens side. q.v. And when, for example, castling
      Kings side then try NOT to move the three Pawns which are in front of
      the King once it has castled. So, get developed. Get Castled. Then move
      the Queen off the back rank so that your Rooks are joined up ready for
      action in the Middle Game and the End Game.

      Always try to avoid ISOLATED Pawns - That is a Pawn which has no
      Pawns on the Files either side of it. And also try to avoid DOUBLED
      Pawns - that is Two Pawns on the same File. These are both big
      weaknesses. Remember also that any Pawn can become a Queen if it
      reaches the eighth rank. Always aim for getting one of them there. So
      look after your Pawns and they will look after you.

      Pressure on the centre of the board can also be done from a distance
      such as in the Fianchetto of a Bishop on the long diagonals. Thus a
      Bishop placed at the Knights second square. Such are often called Indian
      Defences, such as the Kings Indian and the Queens Indian, among many
      others. Novices should quickly come to see the board and pieces as
      being lines of DYNAMICS, POWER, not simply as a piece of wood here and
      piece of wood there. Chess is not about wood-pushing.

      Somebody once asked a reigning world champion as to how many moves he
      looks ahead, thinking that he would say about ten. He replied "only
      one, the best one". This is not strictly true of chess play of
      course, but it makes the point. The most important move in any game of
      chess is your next one. Never move a piece until you have an excellent
      reason for putting it there. And know and understand what that reason
      is. Also keep in mind that the move has to be relevant to the existing
      position on the board, not some pie in the sky exploit which is not
      relevant to the position and the existing dynamics on the board.

      Many moves in all games of chess are not the best ones that could have
      been made, there is often a choice of two or three reasonably good
      moves. But the one who makes the most worst moves is the one who loses
      the game. Chess games are never WON. They are always LOST. Owing to
      making the most inferior moves. So, when analysing your chess games
      never look for where you went RIGHT but as to where you went WRONG.
      Improvement is made by getting less wrong. Just as in real life.

      rwr

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