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As time goes by

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  • William
    Last night I enjoyed a presentation by public television ,hosted by John Sabastian, about the late fifties folk revolution. The Kingston Trio, The Brothers
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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      Last night I enjoyed a presentation by public television ,hosted by John Sabastian, about the late fifties folk revolution. The Kingston Trio, The Brothers four, The Limelighters, The Christy Minstrals were all there and I still knew all the words. There was a great tape of Judy[blue eyes]Collins and Pete Seeger in a duet that showed their great talent and versatality. It was mostly wooden music and featured great vocals and simple melodies from the past. Even my wife who was a bit young during the time liked it and knew most of the words. We sang along and like eighty % of those questioned we sing along in our cars and the shower and with the tube. We cannot live in communal housing because of our loud voices and exhuberance. Our house is double insulated and stops the embarassment. For me the show was inspiring.
      This morning I tried a new BBC sattelite station playing the new music. Lady Ga ga, and the little Perry girl were blasting it out with the British DJ`s acting like old AM jocks commenting at a mile a minute. I was at first about to reject it but then tried to accept it as ocassionally my father would listen to my folk music. I began to appreciate the Retro nature of the presentation and now I think of Dick as he remembers those old poets of his area. "The ones they pick, the ones youll know by" CSNY, "Teach your children" . Bill
    • dick.richardson@rocketmail.com
      I agree with you, and I think all parents ought to at least try and put theirs kids into the picture of how things were; both the good and the bad bits, lest
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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        I agree with you, and I think all parents ought to at least try and put
        theirs kids into the picture of how things were; both the good and the
        bad bits, lest they forget. But all the stuff that was good,
        inspirational, and just fun can still be used today. I know many young
        kids that love the songs of the forties fifties and sixties; and even
        though they do not bring back memories like they do with us. But they
        might one day.



        Music has always been a big thing in my life, predominantly classical
        music, but anything, folk, jazz, blues, the lot of it; if it is good.
        And singing and trying a few instruments. There is an old saying that
        they don't write songs like they used to do; and there is a lot of
        truth in it. I loved songs from all over the world. The first record I
        ever brought (I think I was about three or four) was called Tumbling
        Tumbleweeds by the Sons of the Pioneers, it is still just as good today.
        It is said that when I was about two and half to three that I stood up
        on the seat in a cinema during the break and turned around to the crowds
        behind and sung La Paloma which I had just heard in the film and was
        hooked, and conducted it and they all joined in. Still hooked today :-
        ) I can indeed vaguely remember that. I would not do that now :- ) But
        I did sing in a pub or two, or three.



        One of the things which I used to love was that we kids used gather
        around the lamp post some evenings and sing in four part harmony (it
        just happened that way) and folks would open their windows and lean out
        and join in. You aint going to see that happening these days. They were
        indeed great times even though there was much hardship at that time. I
        cannot remember one experience through childhood and youth which was not
        great, it all was. They don't seem to turn out that way these days.
        I have many favourite singers but at the top of list by far is Eva
        Cassidy. Gawd I would have liked to have known her – in the fields
        of gold ; - )


        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "William" <v.valleywestdental@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Last night I enjoyed a presentation by public television ,hosted by
        John Sabastian, about the late fifties folk revolution. The Kingston
        Trio, The Brothers four, The Limelighters, The Christy Minstrals were
        all there and I still knew all the words. There was a great tape of
        Judy[blue eyes]Collins and Pete Seeger in a duet that showed their great
        talent and versatality. It was mostly wooden music and featured great
        vocals and simple melodies from the past. Even my wife who was a bit
        young during the time liked it and knew most of the words. We sang along
        and like eighty % of those questioned we sing along in our cars and the
        shower and with the tube. We cannot live in communal housing because of
        our loud voices and exhuberance. Our house is double insulated and stops
        the embarassment. For me the show was inspiring.
        > This morning I tried a new BBC sattelite station playing the new
        music. Lady Ga ga, and the little Perry girl were blasting it out with
        the British DJ`s acting like old AM jocks commenting at a mile a minute.
        I was at first about to reject it but then tried to accept it as
        ocassionally my father would listen to my folk music. I began to
        appreciate the Retro nature of the presentation and now I think of Dick
        as he remembers those old poets of his area. "The ones they pick, the
        ones youll know by" CSNY, "Teach your children" . Bill
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • William
        I saw The Sons of the Pioneers at the road show of the Grand ol` opera. They were sold out at the KRNT Radio theatre. They often appeared with Roy Rodgers and
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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          I saw The Sons of the Pioneers at the road show of the Grand ol` opera. They were sold out at the KRNT Radio theatre. They often appeared with Roy Rodgers and he was my childhood hero. Dale could yodel and had a great set of lungs. My Grandfather took me as my dad thought that music to be old time. I also heard Woody Guthery and my grand parents knew him personally. They served Bonnie and Clyde Barrow Sunday dinner not long before they were blown to hell. There were not that many people here before the Baby Boom and folks knew each other. I used to sing Davy Crockett and went room to room in grade school. I had memorised eight verses and would run out of spit before I ran out of lyrics.
          It seems easy to become a crumedgeon and I know I am sometimes guilty. The old English authors you mentioned were not stressed in Catholic school and I know I missed them. We were busy memorising the Baltimore Catechism.
          The theatre I mentioned was the bastion of culture as this place was and is truly rural. In the middle of this big continent there are few cosmopolitan cities and back then radio was the only link to civilisation. I saw the great Gene Pitney at the KRNT. Remember "Town without pity"? The country people called the theatre "The crunt" and could not figure why the city people laughed at that usage. Bill
        • Mary
          As Time Goes Bye is one of my favorite British sitcoms! Anyway, I think it s interesting how Americans adopted British literature but the British adopted
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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            As Time Goes Bye is one of my favorite British sitcoms! Anyway, I think it's interesting how Americans adopted British literature but the British adopted American music. The blues, jazz, R&B, and hip hop are all creations of our multicultural experience, then adopted and created anew with The Beatles, Rolling Stones, and Led Zeppelin. After going through much American folk music over the years, I find the Celtic stuff plucks my heartstrings. I have The Chieftains Long Black Veil, a collaboration with some excellent artists from other genres. I also really like Raising Sand, the Robert Plant, Allison Krauss collaboration. Mary
          • William
            You must remember this ,a kiss is just a kiss a sigh is just a sigh. The fundamental things apply as time goes by. And when two lovers coo,they still say I
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 2, 2010
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              "You must remember this ,a kiss is just a kiss a sigh is just a sigh. The fundamental things apply as time goes by.
              And when two lovers coo,they still say "I love you", on that you can rely, no matter what the future brings as time goes by.
              Moonlight and roses never out of date,hearts full of passion ,jealousy and hate. Woman needs man and man must have his mate,that no one can deny.
              It`s still the same old story,a fight for love and glory,a case of do or die.
              The world will always welcome lovers,as time goes by. "
              From memory. I think Hoagy Carmichael may have written this beauty but I am not sure.Bill
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