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Re: [existlist] Re: Dylan's song and Bell's theorem

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  • tom
    Mary, Bill and all, The interesting aspect to me of so much of the theoretical physics of the 20th century is that the scientific is no longer a materialistic
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 29, 2010
      Mary, Bill and all,

      The interesting aspect to me of so much of the theoretical physics of the 20th century is that the scientific is no longer a materialistic reductionist paradigm opposed to art, mysticism etc. As a child raised a Catholic and sent to Catholic schools, I sometimes wondered whither there was only a choice between dogmatic fundamentalisms on the one hand, and a scientific paradigm on the other that seemed to offer little of human interest, except in that learning certain formulas would get you good grades, and whatever technical applications that brought profit. But it certainly appears that most or all of the major theoretical physicists of the 20th century began to relate their scientific findings to various eastern modalities. Bohm with Krismurti,Wolfgang Pauli and Jung, Tesla and Sri Aurobindo, and Einstein said The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend
      personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the
      natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense
      arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a
      meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any

      religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would beBuddhism. (Albert EinsteinThe religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend
      personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the
      natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense
      arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a
      meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any

      religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would beBuddhism. (Albert Einstein"The religion of the future will be a cosmic religion. It should transcend a personal God and avoid dogma and theology. Covering both the natural and the spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual, it should be based on a religious sense arising from the experience of all things natural and spiritual as a meaningful unity. Buddhism answers this description. If there is any religion that could cope with modern scientific needs it would be Buddhism.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Mary
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 12:39 PM
      Subject: [existlist] Re: Dylan's song and Bell's theorem



      Wonderful, Tom, and don't forget Alain Aspect's experiments which confirmed Bell and others inequalities. I can't grasp the mathematics either, but the poetry isn't lost on me :) Peace, Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <tsmith17_midsouth1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bill,
      >
      > As a fellow Dylan fan, I'd guess you will remember these lines in "If you see her, say hello."
      >
      > And though our separation
      > It pierced me to the heart
      > She still lives inside of me
      > We've never been apart
      >
      > Ironically, these poetic lines have a theoretical physicist counterpart in the following.
      > n 1964 Bell's Theorem emerged as a proof that Einstein's impossible proposition did in fact hold true: instantaneous changes in widely separated systems did occur.
      >
      > In 1972, Clauser confirmed the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, working with an elaborate system involving photons, calcite crystals, and photo multiplier tubes The experiment has since been run several times with the same consistent results; Bell's Theorem stands solid.
      >
      > The implications of Bell's theorem
      > are practically unthinkable
      >
      > Even for the physicists involved, the implications of Bell's Theorem are practically unthinkable. Mathematics and experimentation have taken us where our logical mind cannot go. Imagine, two particles once in contact, separated even to the ends of the universe, change instantaneously when a change in one of them occurs!
      >
      > Slowly, new ideas are emerging to explain these unthinkable occurrences. One view is that, in some unexplainable way, the separated particles are still in contact although separated in space. This is the suggestion of the French physicist Bernard D'Espagnat. In 1979, writing about quantum reality, he said that "the entire notion of an external, fixed, objective world now lies in conflict not only with quantum theory, but in facts drawn from actual experiments.... in some sense all these objects constitute an indivisible whole.
      >
      > Although, I don't have the scientific background to understand the technical issues, it certainly appears to me that 20th century theoretical physics points toward an ultimate reality that is more akin to eastern thought and poetic metaphor than the deterministic model of Newton.
      >
      >
      >
      > Peace and best wishes,
      >
      > Tom
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





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