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Re: [existlist] Re: Re: more spec: thought, spirit, & self-examination

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  • eupraxis@aol.com
    Corey, You write: Both FN & SK where much alike in many aspects of their thought, I also concur. Jaspers called them, the great realists , with a guise which
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 7, 2010
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      Corey,

      You write: "Both FN & SK where much alike in many aspects of their thought, I also concur. Jaspers called them, "the great realists", with a guise which gripped the entire man. They both, says Jaspers, had an authentic feeling for the depths of reality, as individuals in theirs as well as our existenz (in freedom and authenticity before transcendence). I subscribe almost completely."

      In what respects that makes either writer different from other writers, like Dostoevsky or Rilke or Lautremont? And let us remember that Jaspers was essentially a religious thinker, so whatever parallels he saw might have been parallels he made. Nietzsche and Kierkegaard couldn't be more antithetical.

      Wil






      -----Original Message-----
      From: ccorey <ccorey@...>
      To: existlist <existlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, Aug 7, 2010 8:48 am
      Subject: [existlist] Re: Re: more spec: thought, spirit, & self-examination





      Jim,

      You speak of: "a subjectively existing thinker,"

      as in glossings, I believe, over thyself and of self-examination (beholding oneself in the mirror of the world--in SK's light was Socrates: he who had lived [or not] and promoted this examined life). Yes, but I think SK's idea would probably include something more than thinking...I believe he spoke of the spiritual much of the time: "The spirit giveth life." His subjectivity involved spiritual enlightenment, or faith, or Niezsche's equivalent, the will-to...and yes, Both FN & SK where much alike in many aspects of their thought, I also concur. Jaspers called them, "the great realists", with a guise which gripped the entire man. They both, says Jaspers, had an authentic feeling for the depths of reality, as individuals in theirs as well as our existenz (in freedom and authenticity before transcendence). I subscribe almost completely.

      -c-

      Christopher Corey
      Freedom is Existence

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Jim" <jjimstuart1@...>
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, August 7, 2010 8:19:05 AM
      Subject: [existlist] Re: more spec

      … so more specifically, to be an existent individual myself is to be in close perimeter to the inner self...actually, subjectivity is SK's medium towards this opportune existence, to be an existent individual...outside of this existence, for myself, is ontological crisis and just further movement towards the das Man...

      Yes, to be an individual – a subjectively existing thinker – in Kierkegaard's terminology, is to be the complete opposite of das Man (Nietzsche).

      Kierkegaard's and Nietzsche's thinking on the individual overlapped quite a lot, although if they met they would probably have disagreed on the question of freedom.

      Jim

      --
      Christopher Corey
      Freedom is Existence








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