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Re: Letting in the light

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  • shadowed_statue
    Mary, As Bill pointed out, reading Sartre is a fairly new experience for me, and I am utterly unqualified to opine either on the development of his work
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 29, 2010
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      Mary, As Bill pointed out, reading Sartre is a fairly new experience for me, and I am utterly unqualified to opine either on the development of his work through the years, or on the relation between his work and his practice in life. At present, I am persisting with "Being and Nothingness", having arrived at the section on Temporality, as well as returning regularly to his novel of the late forties. Then I have yet to begin on de Beauvoir's "Adieux: A Farewell to Sartre", which comprises diary-based narrative and tape-recorded interviews. Looks promising, to provide an initial overview from the standpoint of his later years. I am just feeling my way into this reading matter from a sense that this recent history, and the philosophical thinking associated, is also the stuff of what is implied by all that surrounds us, now. Well, it is human, basically. Beauvoir dedicates her book "to those who loved Sartre, who do love him, who will love him." Which is all very temporal :-).
      Louise

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hear, hear!
      >
      > Louise, after my immersion with an unconventional philosopher like David Bohm, I agree that philosophy should guide process. Thank you for this well thought out and well written post. I now wonder if you and others would opine on whether you think Sartre took a wrong turn. His concern with justice and oppression seemed to have guided his political philosophy. I suppose my winter project will have to be his CDR.
      >
      > Mary
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "shadowed_statue" <hecubatoher@> wrote:
      > >
      > > "Politics is process and philosophy should guide the proceedings".
      > >
      > > Bill's summation [52183] sends me back to the original question I asked - do all philosophical questions involve the notion of power?
      > >
      > > The question carried with it the implication that all political questions are in fact involved with the notion of power. So it seemed the right question to ask in view of the one asked by Polly - how can philosophy and politics be divorced, which arose from the moderation notice by Susan, to return to topic, i.e. philosophy.
      > >
      > > My sense of it is that philosophy can do its job properly when most independent of aspects of thinking which belong to other disciplines. So I do think that philosophy can guide process by bringing something quite distinct from the world of materiality, fact and information which is quite largely the domain of political reality. Having said that, politics depends greatly also on symbolism and myth, even though it may be fairly unedifying much of the time in the modern world. So I think it is true to say that politics draws on mental realities which are not themselves matters of power, but that ultimately politics refers it all back to power, which philosophy does not. Even building a public library requires power, economic and physical, and its very existence testifies to previous power struggles. The exercise of power requires something distinct from itself to be a guide true to human reality, which is only ever simply a world of brute power when the philosophical element has been driven away from political consideration.
      > >
      > > Concretely, one might say that politics without justice oppresses and restricts human nature, and that politics does not possess the means itself to determine what justice is. The principle of parliamentary scrutiny is deeply embedded in English ways of doing things, and at its best provides an example of thought in the service of protecting the less powerful from excessive or abusive power. Existlist may feasibly attempt to perform that kind of functional reflection, though whether anyone apart from its members take a blind bit of notice is of course questionable. What is clear, from my standpoint, is that if the list only tackles political questions in the way typically, and desirably, in the best cases, by journalism, it fails of its nature, since this list is devoted to existential philosophy, phenomenology and related literature. That is not in general the terrain of the news media. If those genres no longer have anything to show us, what are we doing here? I think we are exploring existentialism, that the genres are still live, and that we are often drifting off course.
      > >
      > > Tout est au mieux dans le meilleur des mondes.
      > >
      > > Louise
      > >
      >
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