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What were they thinking?!?

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  • Mary
    Irvin, in addition to Camus concern with absolutes, he emhasized three modes of becoming: solitude, creativity, and solidarity. An absurd, but passionate
    Message 1 of 23 , May 28 7:26 AM
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      Irvin, in addition to Camus' concern with absolutes, he emhasized three modes of becoming: solitude, creativity, and solidarity. An absurd, but passionate engagement with life requires all three. Camus, Sartre, and Beauvoir admitted they were essentially writers, and dialogue among them broke down as it typically does among even the most well intentioned. I still believe that a Bohmian deconstuction of thought is critical in solving any of our most pressing problems. We are in reactionary mode, not creative mode. Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@...> wrote:
      >
      > The radical musings and howlings of these verbose and abstract academics over the state of things, who are comfortably situated and insulated from life's grit and grime(as are perhaps many of us with the leisure to be on this board)causes me a greater appreciation of the existentialist Albert Camus, who recognized that the quest for freedom and common need within an absurd and not too accomodating universe requires moderation no less than revolt. No gurus, commissars or pseudo-scientific Laws of History for Camus, who in "The Rebel," noted that ideologies guiding our world were born in periods presuming absolute scientific discoveries, while real knowledge justifies limited systems of thought based on limited discoveries. Accordingly, he nodded approvingly to the trade unionism and social democracies of Scandidavian Europe, in contradistinction to fascist or Soviet models born of arrogance and excess.
      >
      > Irvin
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