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Sartre and Existentialist Epistemology

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  • irvhal
    The flurry of recent topics with an epistemic flavor calls to mind a small, but important book by Sarte, Truth and Existence, written in 1948 in response to
    Message 1 of 4 , May 9 4:47 PM
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      The flurry of recent topics with an epistemic flavor calls to mind a small, but important book by Sarte, "Truth and Existence," written in 1948 in response to Heidegger's "On the Essence of Truth," though published post-humously in 1989. In this effort at an existentialist epistemology, Sartre argues that "ignorance is the starting point from which truth extricates itself". Man is temporal, Being is unveiled in the course of life's projects, and those projects start from anticipations which are continuously verified or debunked to the extent they accord with Being. As the realization of an end is pursued through verifying behavior, notes Sartre, the limit of verification is the realization of the end, nodding to American pragmatist William James' observation that the truth of the pudding is indeed in the eating. Food for thought indeed.

      Irvin
    • Mary
      Irvin, I read that book two summers ago, and understood why Sartre chose not to publish it. He never explains what truth actually is but was convinced it
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9 6:01 PM
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        Irvin, I read that book two summers ago, and understood why Sartre chose not to publish it. He never explains what truth actually is but was convinced it cannot be found if one wills to ignore it. With a layman's nod to scientific phenomenology, he concedes that truth is a process of verification, an unfolding if you will. One shows bad faith when one agrees with a given truth rather than subjecting it to verification. Mary

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@...> wrote:
        >
        > The flurry of recent topics with an epistemic flavor calls to mind a small, but important book by Sarte, "Truth and Existence," written in 1948 in response to Heidegger's "On the Essence of Truth," though published post-humously in 1989. In this effort at an existentialist epistemology, Sartre argues that "ignorance is the starting point from which truth extricates itself". Man is temporal, Being is unveiled in the course of life's projects, and those projects start from anticipations which are continuously verified or debunked to the extent they accord with Being. As the realization of an end is pursued through verifying behavior, notes Sartre, the limit of verification is the realization of the end, nodding to American pragmatist William James' observation that the truth of the pudding is indeed in the eating. Food for thought indeed.
        >
        > Irvin
        >
      • irvhal
        Yes, bad faith (which he exemplifies by a turbercular woman who deliberately ignores her accumulating symptoms and societies unduly bound to tradition) was for
        Message 3 of 4 , May 9 8:15 PM
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          Yes, bad faith (which he exemplifies by a turbercular woman who deliberately ignores her accumulating symptoms and societies unduly bound to tradition) was for Sartre an impediment to a genuine unveilment of Being.

          Irvin

          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@...> wrote:
          >
          > Irvin, I read that book two summers ago, and understood why Sartre chose not to publish it. He never explains what truth actually is but was convinced it cannot be found if one wills to ignore it. With a layman's nod to scientific phenomenology, he concedes that truth is a process of verification, an unfolding if you will. One shows bad faith when one agrees with a given truth rather than subjecting it to verification. Mary
          >
          > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@> wrote:
          > >
          > > The flurry of recent topics with an epistemic flavor calls to mind a small, but important book by Sarte, "Truth and Existence," written in 1948 in response to Heidegger's "On the Essence of Truth," though published post-humously in 1989. In this effort at an existentialist epistemology, Sartre argues that "ignorance is the starting point from which truth extricates itself". Man is temporal, Being is unveiled in the course of life's projects, and those projects start from anticipations which are continuously verified or debunked to the extent they accord with Being. As the realization of an end is pursued through verifying behavior, notes Sartre, the limit of verification is the realization of the end, nodding to American pragmatist William James' observation that the truth of the pudding is indeed in the eating. Food for thought indeed.
          > >
          > > Irvin
          > >
          >
        • Mary
          Irvin, thinking about this text, basically his unpublished notes, helps me notice how Sartre s idea of the desire to ignore and refuse responsibility for
          Message 4 of 4 , May 10 8:40 AM
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            Irvin, thinking about this text, basically his unpublished notes, helps me notice how Sartre's idea of the desire to ignore and refuse responsibility for knowing is similar to Bohm's idea of the refusal to observe and think freshly. Sartre, at least in 1948, was considering the notion that truth is a verification process similar to the scientific method, and that if truth is experience, it will always be an unveiling, or as Bohm puts it, an unfolding. With both philosophers, I see the acceptance of objective Truth without absolute Knowledge. Sartre and Bohm endorsed dialectic and dialogue. They both recognized the trap of believing we create reality, when it's quite obvious we are simply reflecting our desire to see what we already think we know. Mary

            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@...> wrote:
            >
            > Yes, bad faith (which he exemplifies by a turbercular woman who deliberately ignores her accumulating symptoms and societies unduly bound to tradition) was for Sartre an impediment to a genuine unveilment of Being.
            >
            > Irvin
            >
            > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Irvin, I read that book two summers ago, and understood why Sartre chose not to publish it. He never explains what truth actually is but was convinced it cannot be found if one wills to ignore it. With a layman's nod to scientific phenomenology, he concedes that truth is a process of verification, an unfolding if you will. One shows bad faith when one agrees with a given truth rather than subjecting it to verification. Mary
            > >
            > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "irvhal" <i99hj@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > The flurry of recent topics with an epistemic flavor calls to mind a small, but important book by Sarte, "Truth and Existence," written in 1948 in response to Heidegger's "On the Essence of Truth," though published post-humously in 1989. In this effort at an existentialist epistemology, Sartre argues that "ignorance is the starting point from which truth extricates itself". Man is temporal, Being is unveiled in the course of life's projects, and those projects start from anticipations which are continuously verified or debunked to the extent they accord with Being. As the realization of an end is pursued through verifying behavior, notes Sartre, the limit of verification is the realization of the end, nodding to American pragmatist William James' observation that the truth of the pudding is indeed in the eating. Food for thought indeed.
            > > >
            > > > Irvin
            > > >
            > >
            >
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