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Re: [existlist] Re: what were they thinking

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  • tom
    Mary, I was checking a few theoretical physicists on the web and found this. Werner Heisenberg [in Physics and Beyond, 1971] recollects a friendly
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 19, 2010
      Mary,

      I was checking a few theoretical physicists on the web and found this.

      "Werner Heisenberg [in Physics and Beyond, 1971] recollects a friendly conversation among young participants at the 1927 Solvay Conference, about Einstein and Planck's views on religion. Wolfgang Pauli, Heisenberg, and Dirac took part in it. Dirac's contribution was a poignant and clear criticism of the political manipulation of religion, that was much appreciated for its lucidity by Bohr, when Heisenberg reported it to him later. Among other things, Dirac said: "I cannot understand why we idle discussing religion. If we are honest - and as scientists honesty is our precise duty - we cannot help but admit that any religion is a pack of false statements, deprived of any real foundation. The very idea of God is a product of human imagination. [...] I do not recognize any religious myth, at least because they contradict one another. [...]" Heisenberg's view was tolerant. Pauli had kept silent, after some initial remarks. But when finally he was asked for his opinion, jokingly he said: "Well, I'd say that also our friend Dirac has got a religion and the first commandment of this religion is 'God does not exist and Paul Dirac is his prophet'". Everybody burst into laughter, including Dirac

      Peace,
      Tom
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Mary
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 19, 2010 10:10 AM
      Subject: [existlist] Re: what were they thinking



      Thanks for this, Tom. Reading these extracts, you can easily see why I have avoided reading him :) While I'm comfortable with the representations and forms of physics, other abstractions such as spirit, intelligence, transcend, etc. usually have me heading the other way. What is drawing me to his philosophy, and his physics, is his insight into thinking and seeing thought as a system which is not serving us well. What perhaps began as an evolutionary advantage might be heading us towards a dead end. If one comprehends evolution from his perspective, one might be more optimistic. Anyone who has even slight cognitive-emotional difference from the average can appreciate his dedication. In fact, his work questions the rightness of what we consider normal. He seems to stay true to physics without resorting to faith in anything other than unknown, unlimited potential.

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <tsmith17_midsouth1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mary,
      >
      > I found this on the web about David Bohm.He certainly appears to have been in the forefront of human evolution.
      >
      > Bohm believes that life and consciousness are enfolded deep in the generative order and are therefore present in varying degrees of unfoldment in all matter, including supposedly "inanimate" matter such as electrons or plasmas. He suggests that there is a "protointelligence" in matter, so that new evolutionary developments do not emerge in a random fashion but creatively as relatively integrated wholes from implicate levels of reality. The mystical connotations of Bohm's ideas are underlined by his remark that the implicate domain "could equally well be called Idealism, Spirit, Consciousness. The separation of the two -- matter and spirit -- is an abstraction. The ground is always one." (Quoted in Michael Talbot, The Holographic Universe, HarperCollins, New York, 1991, p. 271.)
      >
      > As with all truly great thinkers, David Bohm's philosophical ideas found expression in his character and way of life. His students and colleagues describe him as totally unselfish and non-competitive, always ready to share his latest thoughts with others, always open to fresh ideas, and single-mindedly devoted to a calm but passionate search into the nature of reality. In the words of one of his former students, "He can only be characterized as a secular saint." (B. Hiley & F. David Peat eds., Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1987, p. 48.)
      >
      > Bohm believed that the general tendency for individuals, nations, races, social groups, etc., to see one another as fundamentally different and separate was a major source of conflict in the world. It was his hope that one day people would come to recognize the essential interrelatedness of all things and would join together to build a more holistic and harmonious world. What better tribute to David Bohm's life and work than to take this message to heart and make the ideal of universal brotherhood the keynote of our lives.
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      > Peace,
      >
      > Tom
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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