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Re: Goodness of the power, residing in words

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  • louise
    ... And at this point I need to be my own sternest critic, since the speculation about just how great may science come to be is an example of being deceived
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 23, 2009
      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@...> wrote:
      >
      > Mary,
      >
      > I am glad for your patience, and glad also for your opportunity to flee the winter awhile. What I am engaged in may indeed occupy a long period of time. Nietzsche defends the principle of causation in "The Antichrist" [49] insofar as he believes it to be under attack by the priesthood. It is a large question, just how great may science come to be. At present, the scientific consensus honours method and thoroughness of work, but tolerates principles of tyranny quite as depraved as anything practised by zealots of religion. It displays ultimately an absence of ambition. Existential philosophy occupies that territory, of the yearning for freedom, the care for knowledge on which a life may rely, whereas the most adventurous and brilliant achievements of current science remain within the parameters of social convention. It has to be that way, of course, it is history's unfolding, and pioneers in any case often have a hard enough battle demonstrating the new. I just believe in something more, and think it compatible with the particular liberations from authority that existing science has brought us over the centuries.
      >
      > Louise
      And at this point I need to be my own sternest critic, since the speculation about 'just how great may science come to be' is an example of being deceived by my own imagination. I really do need a rest. The strain of trying to hold on to a singular vision is estranging me too far from commonality. L.

      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <josephson45r@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Louise,
      > >
      > > I've always considered the standard definition of cause to be sufficient, However, cause and effect do seem Möbius like, so I suppose this is adequate reason for reconsideration. We can never see or experience an entire interlocking chain of events. Yet the dynamic appears to be operative. I admit that science cannot address all our human needs, but Luddism would leave us without this curious medium.
      > >
      > > My admittedly meagre understanding of Nietzsche is that he analyzed will, morality, and causation. in order to excise them from their religious stricture and replant them in more fertile soil, the living, vibrant, human animal. I don't think he intended to destroy the value of reason or explanation, but I am patient enough to learn how the distinction between will and decision, or necessity and choice, affects us differently.
      > >
      > > Anyway...I was invited; and I accepted, so I'm off chasing the sun.
      > > Mary
      > >
      >
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