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Re: Responsibility

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  • Mary
    I meant humanity, not humility. Also meant lightness of being, not light of being. Humility doesn t come naturally and lightness of being is Kundera s
    Message 1 of 55 , Oct 23, 2009
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      I meant humanity, not humility. Also meant lightness of being, not light of being. Humility doesn't come naturally and lightness of being is Kundera's reference to eternal recurrence which I still do not comprehended. Anyway, before I die perhaps :) Mary

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <mary.josie59@...> wrote:
      >
      > These impassioned posts bring to mind the quest for the Holy Grail, especially Eschenbach's work. The stories were written during the Crusades, and reflect Europe's horror at the worst, and assimilation of the best of Middle Eastern cultures. One must be summoned to the Grail's secrets and personally discover whom it serves. The quest requires ferocity and humility, that rare combination found in Parzival and Nietzsche himself, whose own horror at Wagner's interpretation is noteworthy. Bill is correct that hard times call for hard decisions, and Louise is right in recognizing the common citizen has relinquished their own will to power to government. I'm still trying to find my way back. I'm following carefully, measuring the gravity and alternately, the unbearable light of being. Mary
      >
    • Mary
      I meant humanity, not humility. Also meant lightness of being, not light of being. Humility doesn t come naturally and lightness of being is Kundera s
      Message 55 of 55 , Oct 23, 2009
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        I meant humanity, not humility. Also meant lightness of being, not light of being. Humility doesn't come naturally and lightness of being is Kundera's reference to eternal recurrence which I still do not comprehended. Anyway, before I die perhaps :) Mary

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <mary.josie59@...> wrote:
        >
        > These impassioned posts bring to mind the quest for the Holy Grail, especially Eschenbach's work. The stories were written during the Crusades, and reflect Europe's horror at the worst, and assimilation of the best of Middle Eastern cultures. One must be summoned to the Grail's secrets and personally discover whom it serves. The quest requires ferocity and humility, that rare combination found in Parzival and Nietzsche himself, whose own horror at Wagner's interpretation is noteworthy. Bill is correct that hard times call for hard decisions, and Louise is right in recognizing the common citizen has relinquished their own will to power to government. I'm still trying to find my way back. I'm following carefully, measuring the gravity and alternately, the unbearable light of being. Mary
        >
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