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Re: [existlist] Re: Love

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  • tom
    I think the meaning of love and do what you will is that if a person has love for his fellow beings and his life is dominated by his love for them, the other
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 4, 2009
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      I think the meaning of love and do what you will is that if a person has love for his fellow beings and his life is dominated by his love for them, the other virtues would be axiomatic. These lesser virtues are the manifestation of a caring regard for the well being of all.

      Tom





      > Love is certainly a virtue, possibly the central virtue, but, I suggest, there is a unity of the virtues, and the virtuous person not only manifests love, but also manifests the other core virtues such as truthfulness, justice, temperance, courage, prudence, constancy, amiability, etc.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: shadowed_statue
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, September 04, 2009 4:38 PM
      Subject: [existlist] Re: Love


      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "bhvwd" <v.valleywestdental@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "jimstuart51" <jjimstuart1@> wrote:

      > > Finally, a word of caution. Love is often claimed to be the answer to everything, however, by contrast, I suggest that love is only one of the virtues conducive to living the good life. To advocate love as the only ethical requirement is not really to offer anything substantial. Saint Augustine famously said "Love and do what you will", and whilst this may be a useful antidote to excessive legalism and casuistry, it can be read as just a sentimental platitude.
      > >
      > > Love is certainly a virtue, possibly the central virtue, but, I suggest, there is a unity of the virtues, and the virtuous person not only manifests love, but also manifests the other core virtues such as truthfulness, justice, temperance, courage, prudence, constancy, amiability, etc.
      > >
      > > Any thoughts?
      > >
      > > Jim
      > >Oh yes, Jim!I have never thought of you as an existentialist just as I do not accept love as a concept useful to existentialism. I will not attempt to follow your tripartite confusion about what is a belief. No matter how many segments you cut it into your love is just christian mind control. I will not be controlled by a priestly demand to love all sorts of people and things and gods.
      > Certainly it is apt grist for SK who knew little and therefore resorted to love. You just will not cut away from such spirous thinking and discussing your belief lattice is a waste of synapse. It is the same old game, protestants wanting to be hip and blabbering about love. I would rather roll in the filth of our friendly poronographers who haunt this site. At least they know what they are trying to sell.Peace and lust, Bill
      >However, Jim has described himself as a humanist and atheist, so a critique that attributes to him an idea of love as christian mind control is, potentially at least, premature. All of these descriptive terms are mutable in meaning, and the amount of bullshit involved in our long-running discussions here cannot be quickly cleared away. SK did not involve himself in any enterprise in which he did not know exactly what he was letting himself in for, hence his exemplary conduct, from the standpoint of honour, and the lack of hypocrisy in the way he practised an orthodox, compassionate ethics that evolved to Christian faith. I'm not convinced that the pornographers are either friendly, or, from an existentialist point of view, really know what they are selling, but that would be asking a little too much from commercial opportunists and lubricious narcissists. This subject-matter is difficult to steer away from moral questions, where I am hardly qualified to command credibility, but duty has called, and a merely literary soldier must respond as best she may. The grotesquerie keeps me out of worse mischief for the present. I believe in peace, and, if lust were in the question, would believe in that too. This is England calling, and here there is much hate, sadly. The Second Coming has arrived at a time when all are unprepared, and most are kept from seeing the signs. The secret lodges of the North-East hold all the answers. Louise





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Shining Rainbow
      I am a self taught existentialist, as in I have experienced much and read little. I reckon my views will be ripped apart in this list. But I ll have a go
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 4, 2009
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        I am a self taught existentialist, as in I have experienced much and
        read little. I reckon my views will be ripped apart in this list. But
        I'll have a go anyway.
        Is it not existentialist view that all external phenomena are pure
        subjective sense interpretation, and therefore akin to nothing? The
        "tree falling in the forest - there is no tree" thing.
        And all sense of self at the personality level is subconcious
        mechanism around attachment to the mistaken view that there is an
        objective continuum of external phenomena.
        So, personality is nothing too.

        But if one takes this nothingness to an experiential level, rather
        than a intellectual one - what is this nothingness?
        Does taking responsibility for the ultimate nothingness of everything
        not lead to the deep inner sensation of abiding peace? Compassion...
        Love?

        At an intellectual level existentialism is nihilistic, but
        experientially it is as abundant as Buddha's belly.

        - Rainbow
      • jimstuart51
        Hi Tom, Yes, I think what you write is correct, and fits in with what I said about the unity of the virtues – if an individual is a genuine loving person
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 5, 2009
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          Hi Tom,

          Yes, I think what you write is correct, and fits in with what I said about "the unity of the virtues" – if an individual is a genuine loving person he or she will possess the other virtues as well.

          The point I was trying to make was that an individual needs to understand that it is good to tell the truth, it is good to treat others justly, etc. in order to fully understand what he means to love another person.

          Jim



          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "tom" <tsmith17_midsouth1@...> wrote:
          >
          > I think the meaning of love and do what you will is that if a person has love for his fellow beings and his life is dominated by his love for them, the other virtues would be axiomatic. These lesser virtues are the manifestation of a caring regard for the well being of all.
          >
          > Tom
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > > Love is certainly a virtue, possibly the central virtue, but, I suggest, there is a unity of the virtues, and the virtuous person not only manifests love, but also manifests the other core virtues such as truthfulness, justice, temperance, courage, prudence, constancy, amiability, etc.
          >
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