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Re: [existlist] A new deal

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  • tom
    Bill, A few quotes from the late sci fi writer Arthur Clarke See also: | Evolution (222) | Intelligence (26) | Survival (12) Clarke s First Law: When a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 26, 2009
      Bill,

      A few quotes from the late sci fi writer Arthur Clarke


      See also: | Evolution (222) | Intelligence (26) | Survival (12)



      Clarke's First Law: When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

      - Arthur C(harles) Clarke

      'Hazards of Prophecy: The Failure of Imagination'. In the collection. Profiles of the Future: An Enquiry into the Limits of the Possible (1962, rev. 1973), 14.

      See also: | Age (12) | Impossible (12) | Laboratory (31) | Possible (3) | Research (199) | Scientist (58)



      Clarke's Second Law: The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.

      - Arthur C(harles) Clarke

      Profiles of the Future: An Enquiry into the Limits of the Possible (1962, rev. 1973), 21.

      See also: | Impossible (12) | Research (199)



      Clarke's Third Law:. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

      Anything that is theoretically possible will be achieved in practice, no matter what the technical difficulties are, if it is desired greatly enough.

      I'm sure we would not have had men on the Moon if it had not been for Wells and Verne and the people who write about this and made people think about it. I'm rather proud of the fact that I know several astronauts who became astronauts through reading my books.

      - Arthur C(harles) Clarke

      Address to US Congress, 1975. Science and Technology Committee, United States Congress, House, Future Space Programs, 1975, Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Space Science and Applications (1975), 206. Also in Arthur C. ClarkeThe View from Serendip (1977), 238.

      See also: | Astronaut (8) | Exploration (24) | Moon (32) | Jules Verne (8) | Herbert George (H.G.) Wells (17)



      If we have learned one thing from the history of invention and discovery, it is that, in the long run-and often in the short one-the most daring prophecies seem laughably conservative.

      Peace,
      Tom
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: bhvwd
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2009 3:50 PM
      Subject: [existlist] A new deal


      I have nothing better to do on this lazy Sunday but to put out a strange proposition. What if we could make things ,people invisible ? Recent programs and displays hint that it may be possible. It would seem to deliver a crushing advantage in war. The possibility of an invisible enemy ,inside your defenses just makes fighting such an enemy completely futile. It could accomplish what Oppenheimer thought nuclear weapons might do. That being making war so destructive as to make it never done again. Sounds good but we have proved his logic secondary to proximate need. It is a terror weapon that Osama deserves to deal with. One tangent to the technology points toward time travel. I do not pretend to understand anything besides a wave cancelling technology that could put a stitch in time. I have always known linear time to be the only norm. If that is no longer the case the difference will leak and what an event will do to the fabric of space time would be a experiment with substantial risk. So will they restart CERN this fall? Do the studies on invisibility relate to the objectives of CERN? Does anyone have any idea what I am writing about? My apologies to classical thought. Bill





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