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Assault on language

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  • louise
    What is the nature of the hate which drives English-speakers (and probably more than English-speakers) to adopt an attitude toward language as though it were a
    Message 1 of 31 , Jul 17, 2009
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      What is the nature of the hate which drives English-speakers (and probably more than English-speakers) to adopt an attitude toward language as though it were a hostile force? I suspect that the practice has infected me, as I so frequently experience serious emotional pain from others' accusations and inferences, so that it has become a temptation to invite misunderstanding rather than wounding comment. There may be an element of aggression in my response, since I feel indignant at attacks from invisible, anonymous forces. Difficult to clarify my meaning, since the subject matter strays into the territory of psychiatry, where socio-economic considerations tend to masquerade as medical diagnoses. So I suspect the assault on language to be in part consequence of the contempt in which philosophy is held in the practical Anglo-Saxon world. The effect on my own sensibility has been to draw me into repressed misogyny, since feminism has served women so badly. If they will not give it up, they tend to be the enemies of philosophy. I cannot give up my womanhood. I was born female, hardly a pathological condition.

      Louise
    • louise
      ... I hope so too. Not that I do dislike modernity, though. Maybe I will be able to explain that too, when I have had sufficient time to recover. ... Yes, I
      Message 31 of 31 , Aug 3, 2009
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        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "jimstuart51" <jjimstuart1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Louise,
        >
        > Hopefully at some point you will be able to articulate your
        > objections to feminism. As you suggest, perhaps they are connected to
        > your dislike of modernity.

        I hope so too. Not that I do dislike modernity, though. Maybe I will be able to explain that too, when I have had sufficient time to recover.

        >
        > As for the "silent, obedient child", did you never hear the
        > saying "Children should be seen and not heard"? That was an idea that
        > was still current when I was a child in the fifties and early sixties.

        Yes, I have heard the saying, though not in connection with feminism. Is there a connection? L.

        >
        > Jim
        >
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