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Re: Mining the tradition?

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  • louise
    Wil, I gained that impression, too, that the passages present an account of conservation of mass across change, but such a stark description would seem to
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 29 5:08 AM
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      Wil,

      I gained that impression, too, that the passages present an account of conservation of mass across change, but such a stark description would seem to isolate the logical from the imaginative content. From my perspective, that runs the danger of falsifying a specifically Greek philosophical enquiry. The Greeks really are different from us moderns, as Nietzsche understood.

      Louise

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eupraxis@... wrote:
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      > I have three editions of the work. All seem to agree that the point of the passages is to convey a conservation of mass across change, in keeping with the train of thought from around frag 28 or so. The rest is obscure.
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      > It becomes liquid sea, and is measured
      > [tale] as before it became earth.
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      > Wil
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      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: louise <hecubatoher@...>
      > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sat, 28 Mar 2009 6:52 pm
      > Subject: [existlist] Mining the tradition?
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      > The fragment from Heraclitus, quoted in my previous post, has come down to us without context, just a single brief sentence, recorded by Hippolytus, in his "Refutation of All Heresies". According to T.M.Robinson, the editor of my paperback copy of Heraclitus' texts, the straightforward meaning is that apparent opposites (an 'up' road and a 'down' road) can frequently turn out to be the same thing (ie, a single road) viewed from different perspectives (in this case the bottom of a hill and the top of that hill). Furthermore, that it is impossible to know whether Heraclitus meant us to understand his phrase as referring specifically to cosmological processes, or to the cyclical destiny of soul, or to something else. Fragments 31a and b refer to this cosmic sense, of the cycles of nature, the violence, for instance, of storm, of the bolt of lightning (mentioned specifically in fragment 64*), a reference, for Greek readers, to Zeus, god of the bright aether, possibly to be identified with the substance of fragment 32,
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      > ~ One thing, the only wise thing, is unwilling and willing to be called by the name Zeus. ~
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      > In modern times, I suppose one would be generally thought mad, to consider the aether to be divine.
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      > Louise
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      > *ta de panta oiakizei keraunos.
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      > And thunderbolt steers the totality of things.
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