Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Archetypical fairy stories. from decovney post

Expand Messages
  • Herman B. Triplegood
    Nitai: No scholarship. Just a familiarity. To be human is to stand within the infinite at the position of finitude. The problem is that the immensity, the
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 13, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Nitai:

      No scholarship. Just a familiarity. To be human is to stand within
      the infinite at the position of finitude. The problem is that the
      immensity, the radicality, the primordiality, of the finite is
      actually under appreciated by most philosophers. Just because two
      things, finite and infinite, are opposites, does not mean they never
      meet. They, in fact, do meet, and they meet at the very place where
      we live our lives.

      Hb3g

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "nitaisundara" <nitaisundara@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Herman,
      >
      > Firstly I am curious what translations and commentaries of the
      > Gita you have acquainted yourself with? I don't mean that like you
      > have gotten an improper understanding, but am merely curious because
      > the Gita is in my realm of interest and I was delighted to see it
      pop
      > up here.
      >
      > I agree largely that the Gita is about the human, but moreso it
      > proposes a practical methodology for systematically forming a
      > relationship with that which can never be "known"
      > comprehensively--Krishna. An eternality that does not negate
      > finiteness, a very "human" way of knowing which eradicates the angst
      > of not knowing yet leaves the pleasurable mystery and anticipation.
      > This is the divine wisdom, (sambhanda in sanskrit)-knowledge of who
      > you are, what the world is, and the infinite, and how those three
      > interrelate.
      > nitai
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Herman B. Triplegood" <hb3g@>
      wrote:
      > >
      > > Yes! That's the spirit right there! I get that from The Gita too.
      > > What stands out there is Arjuna's angst facing the imminent
      battle.
      > > That queasy feeling of uneasy mortality. Remember Krshna. Yes.
      But do
      > > not forget Arjuna. Arjuna is the HUMAN in the story. The HUMAN.
      > > That's what the Gita is REALLY all about.
      > >
      > > Consider this. We ask questions. Right? Why? Why do we ask
      questions?
      > > Okay. One could say the answer to that is to get the answers. Of
      > > course it is! Silly!
      > >
      > > But that is not really what I have in mind. What I have in mind
      is
      > > the one thing that makes asking a question, any question, even
      > > possible in the first place. That has to be, always, not yet,
      having
      > > the answer. That has to be, always already, being finite.
      > >
      > > That has to be what Socrates is putting his finger on in the
      Apology
      > > when he says that human wisdom, sophon anthropon, is relatively
      > > worthless when compared to divine wisdom. It has to be what
      > > Socrates "ironically" means when he concludes that he must be
      wise
      > > because he recognizes that he knows, fundamentally, nothing.
      Nothing
      > > at all!
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.