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Re: [existlist] New to Group

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  • Rose Lieberman
    Wil, thanks for all that. I actually almost understood it all. (Almost because I m still not sure about solipsistic. Are you saying that the individual
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 3, 2008
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      Wil, thanks for all that. I actually almost understood it all. (Almost because I'm still not sure about solipsistic. Are you saying that the individual believes self is real and everything and everyone an illusion? Or, self is the only vehicle for experience and outside of one's own experience we can know nothing, so therefore I and whatever I experience are the only real things in the universe?)

      I definitely understand the "nausea" as a reaction to the real. I've experienced it myself. Then a long silence, a grieving sort of crying jag, more silence, then tv, then Ben & Jerry's! Then struggling to let more things go.

      Heidegger sounds like one of the Jehovah's Witnesses who came by my door one day. I made some polite comment about how I saw things and his reaction was: "But aren't you afraid of spending eternity in hell?" And of course my response argued whether that was the way god wanted me - a scared faithless believer? And they both looked at each other and almost in concert agreed that they would rather not be in hell, so they would elect to be believers. Oh, well.

      Oh, and I especially liked your nihilism explanation regarding modern religion as being all the more nihilistic the more it tries to convince itself that it still matters. But of course, they don't know they're being nihilistic, they still think they're deepening their faith and understanding. (Right?)

      Sometimes I feel like I must be more nihilistic, as I question the relevance of anything and everything, but then when I look at those definitions in the FAQ I could be falling into a sort of existential vacuum - which sounds more like a psychological condition, as opposed to a knowing or a conclusion based on rational thought.

      Then I look at the blurb about Frankl: "According to Viktor Frankl, the existential vacuum is apparently a concomitant of industrialization. When neither instinct nor social tradition direct man toward what he ought to do, soon he will not even know what he wants to do, and the existential vacuum results." I can understand this in a very real way.

      I say this because it's when I'm living the "camping life", living around the woodstove, off-the grid, etc. - which we have done and I feel the need to return to - I feel at peace. Not because of the lack of noise and interruption, but because of living in the moment, being present in my own life, being literally and figuratively responsible for it on a daily basis.

      Later,

      Rose

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    • eupraxis@aol.com
      Are you saying that the individual believes self is real and everything and everyone an illusion? Or, self is the only vehicle for experience and outside of
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 3, 2008
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        "Are you saying that the individual believes self is real and everything and everyone an illusion? Or, self is the only vehicle for experience and outside of one's own
        experience we can know nothing, so therefore I and whatever I
        experience are the only real things in the universe?"

        Either position could called solipsistic. Silly, eh?

        Wil












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