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Kierkegaard & The Existent

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  • ccorey@frontiernet.net
    Kierkegaard & The Existent Kierkegaard proposed the notion that truth lies in subjectivity; that true existence is achieved by intensity of feeling. He said he
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 26, 2008
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      Kierkegaard & The Existent

      Kierkegaard proposed the notion that truth lies in subjectivity; that
      true existence is achieved by intensity of feeling. He said he was the
      moment of individuality, but refused to be a paragraph in a system
      hence his name ?The Individual,? which could be defined as uniqueness.
      He says that we have forgotten what it is to exist. His principle
      enemy was the expositor of a system i.e. Hegel. The existent
      individual is first of all he who is in an infinite relationship with
      himself and has an infinite interest in himself and his destiny. In
      addition, the existent individual always feels himself to be in
      becoming, with a task before him; and applying this to Christianity.
      He says ?one is not a Christian ? one becomes a Christian.? It is a
      matter of sustained effort. The existent individual is impassioned
      with a passionate thought; he is inspired; he is a kind of incarnation
      of the infinite in the finite. This passion which animates the
      existent is what Kierkegaard calls ?the passion of freedom.? The
      existent is on a quest disclosing the object of his thought and is
      filled with uncertainty and an infinite passion. When on this quest,
      the existent will strive (as a Christian) towards possibilities and
      for contact with being and works to simplify himself; to return to
      original and authentic experience. According to Kierkegaard, while in
      the presence of God, the consciousness of sin is the only way to the
      religious life. The existent seeks a relation with God, what
      Kierkegaard calls, ?the absolute Other.? As for Kierkegaard himself,
      his conceptions are accentuated by the paradox or the union of the
      finite and the infinite. In conclusion, Kierkegaard?s reflections are
      later translated into more intellectual terms by Karl Jaspers and
      Martin Heidegger.

      -c-

      Christopher Corey
      Freedom is Existence
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