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Bigotry, Prejudice... was Re: A few general thoughts

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  • Exist List Moderator
    I think we are witnessing the problems associated with relativism, something that is not actually embraced by any of the existentialists I can recall. If
    Message 1 of 29 , Jun 30, 2008
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      I think we are witnessing the problems associated with relativism,
      something that is not actually embraced by any of the
      "existentialists" I can recall. If anything, there were some cultural
      elitists and social elitists among the previous generations -- I do
      not think that a bad thing.

      I admit I am prejudiced against many cultural practices and norms. I
      believe women and men are social equals, so I have serious issues with
      many cultures that abuse women citing religious beliefs, cultural
      histories, or whatever else.

      I am prejudiced against most religious orthodoxy, which is why I must
      remind myself of the theologians who did make the world a better place
      -- but I am certain religion isn't helping many people now.

      Most of the existential thinkers, from Buber and Tillich to
      (certainly) Merleau-Ponty and Jaspers, education was seen as the way
      to assimilate cultures and ideas.

      Immigrants to "the West" need to embrace rule of law, secular norms,
      and accept free speech they dislike. At the same time, we need to
      understand that it can take two or three generations for assimilation.
      We will gain from the immigrants in the arts (and food), while they
      (hopefully) learn to tolerate a culture they claim is decadent. That
      decadency is freedom... with all its warts.

      Xenophobia might be a problem, but I understand based on my
      experiences in Minnesota why people generalize about immigrants.
      Understanding takes compromises, but some things should not be
      compromised to make immigrants comfortable. They will have to learn to
      adapt, and that won't be easy for many.

      It was Gay Pride weekend. We've had an immigrant bus driver refuse to
      drive a bus with a "gay" advertisement. That's no less troubling than
      if it were a Christian conservative, but it is part of a trend here in
      Minneapolis. Taxis that won't pickup women. Students threatening a
      teacher's "care" dog. Defending the abuse of women in the name of a
      religious text. Refusing to sell some groceries that contain pork.

      It seems natural that there is now a backlash against the immigrants.
      It's wrong to blame them and hate them, but the anger is something I
      understand.

      Education... it's our only hope. Then again, I read that 18 percent of
      Americans think the sun rotates around the earth because their
      religions say so. Can I just be prejudiced against all ignorance?

      - CSW
    • ccorey@frontiernet.net
      We are the ones, at the end of the line with crippled perceptions, but we must not ignore the varied portions of truth that lie within, our speech is mundane,
      Message 2 of 29 , Jul 6, 2008
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        We are the ones,
        at the end of the line
        with crippled perceptions,
        but we must not ignore the varied portions
        of truth that lie within,
        our speech is mundane,
        and our western conceptions are
        sometimes grounded in absurdity,
        but claimed exaggerations are wise at times,
        these thoughts they touch us,
        and with arms outstretched
        we are lured,
        not enlightened,
        only at certain moments of clarity can we see
        the conceptual unity of negative judgments,
        an exception to our misgivings,
        we must not mistake the truth for farce,
        this differentiation is immanent for the awakening of intelligence

        -Christopher Corey, July 2008
      • louise
        ... After the second and third readings I liked this piece more and more. I see it as tightly ordered prose, spaced by a verse-like form. In particular I
        Message 3 of 29 , Jul 7, 2008
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          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, ccorey@... wrote:
          >
          > We are the ones,
          > at the end of the line
          > with crippled perceptions,
          > but we must not ignore the varied portions
          > of truth that lie within,
          > our speech is mundane,
          > and our western conceptions are
          > sometimes grounded in absurdity,
          > but claimed exaggerations are wise at times,
          > these thoughts they touch us,
          > and with arms outstretched
          > we are lured,
          > not enlightened,
          > only at certain moments of clarity can we see
          > the conceptual unity of negative judgments,
          > an exception to our misgivings,
          > we must not mistake the truth for farce,
          > this differentiation is immanent for the awakening of intelligence
          >
          > -Christopher Corey, July 2008
          >

          After the second and third readings I liked this piece more and
          more. I see it as tightly ordered prose, spaced by a verse-like
          form. In particular I admire the line, 'our speech is mundane'. In
          reading, though, the plethora of commas puzzled me. So I asked
          myself, how would these lines be punctuated, if I wished to show how
          they sound best to me? The answer was, to replace commas with full
          stops, after 'within', 'times', 'enlightened', 'misgivings'
          and 'farce'. Not a suggestion, even, simply a response. Just as I
          do not see myself as any kind of character in a court of law, I
          should hate also to be mistaken for a teacher or lecturer. Louise
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