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  • C. S. Wyatt
    Though there are still some books I recently purchased that are not yet on this list, I have updated the really, really huge reference list of the Existential
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 3, 2008
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      Though there are still some books I recently purchased that are not yet on this list, I have
      updated the really, really huge reference list of the Existential Primer:

      http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist/sources.shtml

      If you really want to learn about philosophy, you have to read -- and read some more. I
      always caution students not to take any book, by any author, as "The Answer" in philosophy
      or rhetoric. You learn a lot more through living. But, I do love books and they certainly offer
      me new perspectives to merge into my own experiences and thoughts.

      Susan commented that my personal book list, which I track using the absolutely wonderful
      EndNote software, rivals any bookstore and even some small libraries. I have accidentally
      purchased duplicates in the past, so I now export the list to keep with me on a PDA.

      I hope this update helps everyone. If I am missing something major, let me know. I will
      update the bibliography again at the end of this summer when I have a bit more time.

      - C. S. Wyatt
    • Herman B. Triplegood
      Yes, I am a lover of books, and a lover of life as well. The two should belong together, don t you think? Right now I am up to my neck in Spinoza s Ethics. It
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 3, 2008
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        Yes, I am a lover of books, and a lover of life as well. The two
        should belong together, don't you think?

        Right now I am up to my neck in Spinoza's Ethics. It is really
        beautiful. Spinoza is merciless. The demolition of freedom is
        particularly disconcerting. But I can see how, from that sub specie
        aeternitatis point of view that Spinoza has adopted, a kind of
        profoundly Stoic equanimity, an ataraxia, can then result. Spinoza
        feels very much like Boethius. But he isn't as friendly toward the
        idea of free will.

        The hardest thing, I think, is to remain silent, while reading, and
        to let the philosopher speak his truth before you attempt to demolish
        him. Some are supremely difficult to demolish. Some can never be
        demolished. Either, because they are too clever, or, because they are
        so profound.

        Reading Spinoza, I am left, empty-handed, annihilated, and wondering,
        how do I refute that? I thought that I was free. Apparently,
        according to Spinoza, freedom isn't really what I always thought it
        was. I will mourn, on account of this man, for myself, for my
        freedom, for a long time to come.

        He promises me tranquility. Why do I feel so stirred to this
        restlessness by him? Spinoza is that paradox. Perhaps, his promise,
        is disappointment itself.

        Yet, the final book has not been written. Certainly not by Spinoza.
        Not by Kant. Or Sartre. Freedom is a mystery, perhaps, even an
        absurdity, that we cannot live without. It may be, in the end, that
        it is freedom's right to assert itself as this arbitrary in the face
        of, and in contradistinction to, in contradiction of, all good reason
        and the totalizing interest of knowledge. Freedom and reason, freedom
        and knowledge, may, in fact, always be nemesis, locked into each
        other at the foundation, in perpetual struggle, as love and hate,
        happiness and despair, slavery and mastery.

        I think that if we could solve the riddle of either knowledge, or
        freedom, we would inevitably lose the other. As human beings, we
        really can't live without both.

        Hb3g

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "C. S. Wyatt" <existlist1@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Though there are still some books I recently purchased that are not
        yet on this list, I have
        > updated the really, really huge reference list of the Existential
        Primer:
        >
        > http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist/sources.shtml
        >
        > If you really want to learn about philosophy, you have to read --
        and read some more. I
        > always caution students not to take any book, by any author,
        as "The Answer" in philosophy
        > or rhetoric. You learn a lot more through living. But, I do love
        books and they certainly offer
        > me new perspectives to merge into my own experiences and thoughts.
        >
        > Susan commented that my personal book list, which I track using the
        absolutely wonderful
        > EndNote software, rivals any bookstore and even some small
        libraries. I have accidentally
        > purchased duplicates in the past, so I now export the list to keep
        with me on a PDA.
        >
        > I hope this update helps everyone. If I am missing something major,
        let me know. I will
        > update the bibliography again at the end of this summer when I have
        a bit more time.
        >
        > - C. S. Wyatt
        >
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