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Re: innocents at home

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  • Herman B. Triplegood
    Is philosophy literature? Is an argument a narrative? Is narrative, all that there ever really is? Even dialectic...contentious narrative...but narrative,
    Message 1 of 4 , May 30, 2008
      Is philosophy literature? Is an argument a narrative? Is narrative,
      all that there ever really is? Even dialectic...contentious
      narrative...but narrative, nevertheless.

      Existence precedes narrative...narrative precedes
      dialectic...dialectic precedes essence...essence precedes
      deconstruction...deconstruction precedes freedom...

      What does freedom precede? Nothing. Freedom is the target. Once you
      got that, you are done with beginning. Then you get down to brass
      tacks. The horizon is open, and the plasticity is infinite, in that
      range of action, that is the indifference, to every limit...no such
      thing, as you can't get there from here...

      If you still believe, then, you cannot be god...because, god is free,
      and belief is not.

      god must be an atheist.

      Why?

      The atheist believes in no higher being.
      god is the highest being.
      Therefore, god cannot believe in a higher being.

      god is an atheist...QED.

      god can only believe in himself, or herself, or whatever self god
      happens to be...at that time.
      And self-belief is self-authorization.
      And self-authorization is self-certainty.
      And self-certainty is freedom to be a self.
      And freedom to be a self is every ego's egoistic right.

      Such a bad rap, it is that, the poor ego gets, at the hands of the
      ascetic ideal that denies its own life...naughty little Schopenhauer,
      should have known better than that. But when Nietzsche saw what
      Schopenhauer had done, he corrected him, with a hammer, and a
      supernatural laugh, as Zarathustra went whizzing by, such a
      vigilante, an overman, intoxicated, Dionysian, anti-christ can be.

      god must be an existentialist...QED

      ?

      Meandering.

      The acid test: go for broke, do the theology thing, do Augustine, and
      Aquinas too, don't forget Luther and Calvin too...and remain,
      atheistically standing, without fear of conversion. Let the Jehovah's
      Witnesses in, when they come to the door, and offer them coffee
      (American), or tea (British).

      A real stoic can do all of that. The ataraxia, a tranquility, not
      indifference, self security, self certainty...how Cartesian...not
      peacefulness, freedom from and freedom for...Philosophy is
      phenomenon. So is theology. You can get the rationale, without having
      to swallow the reason...hook, line, and sinker.

      Fear not, the idea...or the argument. Detachment: a key to insight.
      All things considered, is the way to go...it is, being
      philosophically hip, or something like that...anyway.

      Rambling...with a sense of rambling purpose...looking for all things,
      not yet broken...

      Hb3g

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "mary.jo11" <mary.jo11@> wrote:
      > >
      > > "louise" <hecubatoher@> wrote:
      > > > experience is not transferable.
      > >
      > > Not directly, of course. It's more akin to relating "how" you
      sleep,
      > > undergo anesthesia, or death :)
      > >
      > > Narrative must often suffice, but is it philosophy or literature?
      > >
      > > Mary
      > >
      >
      > Afraid you've lost me there, Mary. My own reference was to
      > subjective experience in general, with the particular instance of
      > coming to understand how for some of physically human shape, even
      > calculated sadism may afford pleasure without pause for question.
      It
      > is hardly a matter of beyond good and evil, but of not having
      arrived
      > at the point where there is a clear division. Something to do with
      > the illusion of belief, I suspect. Men (or women) who feel
      > themselves to be gods, whilst not having first obtained freedom
      from
      > socially inculcated, unexamined systems of belief. Louise
      >
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