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Existential Despair and Bipolar Disorder:

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  • peaceofmind176
    The major clinical morbidity of bipolar disorder is chronic depression. Yet this depression, which is resistant to our best pharmacological treatments, may
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 9, 2007
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      The major clinical morbidity of bipolar disorder is chronic
      depression. Yet this depression, which is resistant to our best
      pharmacological treatments, may represent something else. We suggest
      it may involve existential despair, as a consequence of the losses
      incurred by this illness.

      Elation is seen not only in manic pathology. We should be able to
      find aspects of our own experience that allow us to empathize with
      it. Take New Year's Eve celebrations, for instance. In some ways,
      what a foolish idea such celebrations are: Why would the events of
      the next year be any better than those of every year past? And yet,
      we celebrate the New Year with renewed hope and renewed ambitions.

      Talking with a bipolar patient is not easy, but it is also not
      hopeless. Bipolar patients are hopeful, ever hopeful, and indeed
      often too hopeful. But their hopes and dreams, however big, are
      usually brief and soon damaged by the realities of life. Ultimately,
      most patients with bipolar disorder become chronically depressed,
      denied of their hopes by others. Appropriate medication treatment is
      necessary, but not sufficient, for many such persons.
    • louise
      ... suggest ... Ultimately, ... is ... Empathy is a palliative, I suppose. Wise and realistic kindness is usually preferable. Best of all, to adapt the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 9, 2007
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        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "peaceofmind176"
        <peaceofmind176@...> wrote:
        >
        > The major clinical morbidity of bipolar disorder is chronic
        > depression. Yet this depression, which is resistant to our best
        > pharmacological treatments, may represent something else. We
        suggest
        > it may involve existential despair, as a consequence of the losses
        > incurred by this illness.
        >
        > Elation is seen not only in manic pathology. We should be able to
        > find aspects of our own experience that allow us to empathize with
        > it. Take New Year's Eve celebrations, for instance. In some ways,
        > what a foolish idea such celebrations are: Why would the events of
        > the next year be any better than those of every year past? And yet,
        > we celebrate the New Year with renewed hope and renewed ambitions.
        >
        > Talking with a bipolar patient is not easy, but it is also not
        > hopeless. Bipolar patients are hopeful, ever hopeful, and indeed
        > often too hopeful. But their hopes and dreams, however big, are
        > usually brief and soon damaged by the realities of life.
        Ultimately,
        > most patients with bipolar disorder become chronically depressed,
        > denied of their hopes by others. Appropriate medication treatment
        is
        > necessary, but not sufficient, for many such persons.
        >

        Empathy is a palliative, I suppose. Wise and realistic kindness is
        usually preferable. Best of all, to adapt the poet's line,
        depression would be no more, if we did not make somebody lie. Alas,
        in such a plebeian hell, even the puns only twist the knife. If you
        don't want to read this, why are you hanging out at an academic
        list? Personally, I do not suffer from existential despair, only
        from the sort of anger which social conditions relentlessly
        suppress. Is it permissible to say any of these things, in public?
        How important is good manners? And so on.

        Louise
        ... patient Nooist citizen
      • ccorey@frontiernet.net
        What exactly do (you) mean by (existential despair)? I highly doubt you mean it in the true Kierkegarrdian way...but correct me if I am wrong... -c- ...
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 9, 2007
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          What exactly do (you) mean by (existential despair)? I highly doubt
          you mean it in the true Kierkegarrdian way...but correct me if I am
          wrong...

          -c-

          Quoting peaceofmind176 <peaceofmind176@...>:

          > The major clinical morbidity of bipolar disorder is chronic
          > depression. Yet this depression, which is resistant to our best
          > pharmacological treatments, may represent something else. We suggest
          > it may involve existential despair, as a consequence of the losses
          > incurred by this illness.
          >
          > Elation is seen not only in manic pathology. We should be able to
          > find aspects of our own experience that allow us to empathize with
          > it. Take New Year's Eve celebrations, for instance. In some ways,
          > what a foolish idea such celebrations are: Why would the events of
          > the next year be any better than those of every year past? And yet,
          > we celebrate the New Year with renewed hope and renewed ambitions.
          >
          > Talking with a bipolar patient is not easy, but it is also not
          > hopeless. Bipolar patients are hopeful, ever hopeful, and indeed
          > often too hopeful. But their hopes and dreams, however big, are
          > usually brief and soon damaged by the realities of life. Ultimately,
          > most patients with bipolar disorder become chronically depressed,
          > denied of their hopes by others. Appropriate medication treatment is
          > necessary, but not sufficient, for many such persons.
          >
          >
          >
          >



          CHRISTOPHER COREY (HIGH BANDWIDTH DESIGN & METAPHYSICAL RESEARCH)
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