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RE: [existlist] Oblivion, etc.

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  • eduard at home
    c --- I only mention it in German because to mention it in English would connect to it traditional connotations of a definite human nature...Heidegger himself
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 26, 2007
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      c ---
      I only mention it in German because to mention it in English would
      connect to it traditional connotations of a definite human
      nature...Heidegger himself avoids the use of the terms [man,] [human,]
      [human being] instead he uses words like [Dasein"] which is, of
      course, a common German philosophical term to designate [existence],
      which in his use is also meant to preserve its literal meaning of
      "being-there" (Sein-da)

      I was not asking for a translation of the German word rather what the
      ?Oblivion of Being? means to you?

      Sartre tells us, in his [Human Emotions,] that if we eliminate our
      being we would be left in a state of pure desire, and this is the way
      to the one thing all men truly desire: to become God.

      do you buy this?

      P.S. The book I am starting is [Kant and The Problem of Metaphysics]
      which is an interpretation of ?The Critique of Pure Reason? as a
      laying of the foundation of metaphysics which attempts to clarify
      these four points:

      1. The point of departure of the laying of the foundation of
      metaphysics.
      2. The carrying out of the laying of foundation of metaphysics.
      3. The laying of the foundation of metaphysics in its basic
      originality.
      4. The laying of the foundation of metaphysics in a repetition

      eduard ---
      Sartre and the rest of them have a much too dark perspective.
      "Oblivion" and that sort of thing. And it is hardly the case that men truly
      desire to become god. Let's face the only people that are really thinking
      of this stuff is the philosophers. Most North Americans don't even think
      about death, other than trying to figure out to whom to will their MP3
      player.

      And as far as desiring to be God, perhaps Sartre did, but I can't
      think of anyone else.

      If you want to know about existence and oblivion, ask a fly. I
      watched one who had fallen into a small pool of water in the kitchen.
      He/she could not quite overcome the water tension to get out and wing itself
      away. Was that fly thinking that it should be God?? Is it thinking about
      oblivion??
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