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using the past as an aid to interpret modern existence

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  • star
    My first point: discussion of ideas I found interesting. My second: evaluation of statements or beliefs for intent. When Nietzsche wrote that about America,
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2007
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      My first point: discussion of ideas I found interesting.
      My second: evaluation of statements or beliefs for intent. When
      Nietzsche wrote that about America, it was a different time. I wonder
      what he would say now, about America, about modern human existence. I
      am most certainly not saying that America is beyond criticism or
      evaluation. As a matter of fact, I think most statements/
      beliefs/theories need to be evaluated and re-evaluated to be sure that
      they still ring true. Even the works of philosophers that we hold in
      high esteem should be evaluated to see how they apply to what is
      happening in the world today, in the lives of people today. The
      problem that I see is with interpretation. How can we know
      Nietzsche's authorial intent for certain? How much can we leave up to
      the perception of ourselves and others? And how, now that he is no
      longer with us, can we bring this authorial intent to the modern day,
      without corruption? Can we truly apply his thoughts to modern
      existence, outside of their original context? How?
    • eupraxis@aol.com
      While I love Nietzsche to the hilt, I can say without any reservation that his political sense was rather limited. He was, by all estimations, an a-political
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 31, 2007
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        While I love Nietzsche to the hilt, I can say without any reservation that his "political" sense was rather limited. He was, by all estimations, an a-political 'aristocrat' in the Athenian or ancient sense (a meritocrat, really). Still, given the obvious and odious nature of, at least, current US international and 'intra-national' policy, he would be horrified at our (that is, the US's) pseudo-Wilsonian empire grab and all of the Christian crap that that goes along with it.

        Wil

        -----Original Message-----
        From: libbyawilliams@...
        To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, 31 Jan 2007 12:55 PM
        Subject: [existlist] using the past as an aid to interpret modern existence

        My first point: discussion of ideas I found interesting.
        My second: evaluation of statements or beliefs for intent. When
        Nietzsche wrote that about America, it was a different time. I wonder
        what he would say now, about America, about modern human existence. I
        am most certainly not saying that America is beyond criticism or
        evaluation. As a matter of fact, I think most statements/
        beliefs/theories need to be evaluated and re-evaluated to be sure that
        they still ring true. Even the works of philosophers that we hold in
        high esteem should be evaluated to see how they apply to what is
        happening in the world today, in the lives of people today. The
        problem that I see is with interpretation. How can we know
        Nietzsche's authorial intent for certain? How much can we leave up to
        the perception of ourselves and others? And how, now that he is no
        longer with us, can we bring this authorial intent to the modern day,
        without corruption? Can we truly apply his thoughts to modern
        existence, outside of their original context? How?


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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mary
        Sure, this is usually a good discussion. Today, I m fortunate enough to find a 1967 first edition of Hazel E. Barnes An Existentialist Ethics. In the preface
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 31, 2007
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          Sure, this is usually a good discussion. Today, I'm fortunate enough to
          find a 1967 first edition of Hazel E. Barnes "An Existentialist Ethics."
          In the preface she states she is "determined to discuss the
          existentialist choice as a living option for real people in today's
          world, not as a proposition labeled X to be logically analyzed in
          relation to other abstract alternatives." Of course this was written
          merely 40 years ago and is contemporary with my generation.

          Mary

          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "star" <libbyawilliams@...> wrote:

          Even the works of philosophers that we hold in high esteem should be
          evaluated to see how they apply to what is happening in the world
          today, in the lives of people today.
        • eupraxis@aol.com
          I was in seminar of Barnes many years ago. One tough broad. I was surprised that she was a right-winger, though. and apparently a christian of some kind. W ...
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 31, 2007
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            I was in seminar of Barnes many years ago. One tough broad. I was surprised
            that she was a right-winger, though. and apparently a christian of some kind.

            W


            In a message dated 1/31/07 5:57:16 PM, agignesthai@... writes:


            >
            > Sure, this is usually a good discussion. Today, I'm fortunate enough to
            > find a 1967 first edition of Hazel E. Barnes "An Existentialist Ethics."
            > In the preface she states she is "determined to discuss the
            > existentialist choice as a living option for real people in today's
            > world, not as a proposition labeled X to be logically analyzed in
            > relation to other abstract alternatives. relation to other abstract a
            > merely 40 years ago and is contemporary with my generation.
            >
            > Mary
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • star
            wow... the ... That gets us going on perception immediately. It reminds me that there are those who think that philosophical inquiry is pretentious and has
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 31, 2007
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              wow..."the
              > existentialist choice as a living option for real people in today's
              > world, not as a proposition...to be logically analyzed in
              > relation to other abstract alternatives."

              That gets us going on perception immediately. It reminds me that
              there are those who think that philosophical inquiry is pretentious
              and has nothing to do with reality, as in the fact that no matter what
              we believe, we still have to go to work, pay our bills, die
              eventually, etc. But as soon as the statement is made...you have to
              define reality, on many levels. Solipsist/realist?
              Religious/empiricist? "Reality"/perception? (Modern reference:
              Dawkins/Collins?)

              How abstract is this really? Where does existentialism encroach on
              "reality"?

              I would love to know what Barnes concludes in her book.





              --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary" <agignesthai@...> wrote:
              >
              > Sure, this is usually a good discussion. Today, I'm fortunate enough to
              > find a 1967 first edition of Hazel E. Barnes "An Existentialist Ethics."
              > In the preface she states she is "determined to discuss the
              > existentialist choice as a living option for real people in today's
              > world, not as a proposition labeled X to be logically analyzed in
              > relation to other abstract alternatives." Of course this was written
              > merely 40 years ago and is contemporary with my generation.
              >
              > Mary
              >
              > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "star" <libbyawilliams@> wrote:
              >
              > Even the works of philosophers that we hold in high esteem should be
              > evaluated to see how they apply to what is happening in the world
              > today, in the lives of people today.
              >
            • Mary
              Groovy. If I recall correctly, George Cotkin writes in his book Existential America that she was the first to translate and teach Sartre in the U.S. Mary ...
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 1, 2007
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                Groovy. If I recall correctly, George Cotkin writes in his
                book "Existential America" that she was the first to translate and
                teach Sartre in the U.S.

                Mary

                --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eupraxis@... wrote:

                I was in seminar of Barnes many years ago. One tough broad. I was
                surprised that she was a right-winger, though. and apparently a
                christian of some kind.
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