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Re: choice

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  • Larry
    ... Hi Mary, Thanks for your reply. Having thought about this further I think choice is volition and doubt, usually, but in all cases volition at least. Doubt
    Message 1 of 39 , Jul 2, 2006
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      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "two_owl_night" <two_owl_night@...> wrote:
      >
      > Your question is either lazy, loaded, or leading. I'll choose the
      > latter and assume that your questions revolve around the issue of
      > illusion and human awareness and how these render choice an absurd
      > impossibility. How and why did you choose* to study abhidhamma?
      >
      > Existentialism posits that we can't avoid choice. As I see it choice
      > involves a couple facets. Firstly, do you know what you want? How
      > strongly do you will or want it? Do you have the power to obtain or
      > achieve it? Do you have the courage? Do you have or want control over
      > yourself or others? Are you creative or imaginative, either
      > scientifically or artistically? Control, courage, and creativity are
      > at the core of most of our daily activities whether we recognize them
      > as such or not, like choice, which is a determined brain activity.
      > Individuality causes different choices, but choices nonetheless.
      > Control of others is difficult if not impossible. Courage involves
      > risk and responsibility. And creativity is useful for envisioning
      > possibilities, stress relief; and when all else fails, promoting your
      > ideas for the good of yourself and/or others.
      >
      > Mary
      >
      > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, LBIDD@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi all,
      > >
      > > I'm a student of Buddhism who recently acquired in interest in
      > > existentialism. As I understand it, choice is a key concept in
      > > existentialism, but Buddhist mind science (abhidhamma) doesn't really
      > > recognize this phenomenon. Is there such a thing as the
      > phenomenology of
      > > choice in existentialism? What is it? How does it work? What are its
      > > consequences? What is the psychology of choice?
      > >
      > > Larry
      > >
      >

      Hi Mary,

      Thanks for your reply. Having thought about this further I think choice is volition and
      doubt, usually, but in all cases volition at least. Doubt is superficially doubt about ethical
      value (good/bad), but on a deeper level doubt is simply ignorance of nothingness. A
      Buddhist would say nothingness is emptiness, but emptiness is always characterized as
      empty of something in particular. What does 'nothingness' mean to you?

      Larry
    • mischke@pronetisp.net
      This has been the best conversation I ve read on existlist in a long time. I think I ll try to tackle Being and Nothingness again this summer. You can
      Message 39 of 39 , Jul 10, 2006
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        This has been the best conversation I've read on "existlist" in a long time.

        I think I'll try to tackle "Being and Nothingness" again this summer.

        "You can choose a ready guide in some celestial voice
        If you choose not to decide you still have made a choice
        You can choose from phantom fears or kindness that can kill
        I will choose a path that's clear
        I will chooose free will"

        RUSH
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