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Re: [existlist] Introduction and a brief question about Existentialism

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  • John Meyer
    ... Kind of get it, The only thing you can understand and decide on is you. There is no grand destiny, or miracles that God provides. God won t come down
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 2, 2006
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      On Monday 02 January 2006 8:40 pm, Exist List Moderator wrote:

      > It is not that life "sucks" so much as "you are on your own" in life.
      > There is quite a difference. Kierkegaard argued that even a Christian
      > is alone to make decisions, doubting that God was going to stand at
      > your side and offer you daily advice. Sartre went further and argued
      > that there is nothing, no meaning at all, beyond the individual. You
      > are not only on your own, but this is it -- the one shot trip to be all
      > you want or as little as you want.
      >


      Kind of get it, "The only thing you can understand and decide on is you."
      There is no grand destiny, or miracles that God provides. God won't come
      down from his clouds and instantly grant you what you want or show you the
      exact path that you should walk. You have to find that path on your own.
    • Exist List Moderator
      ... It is not that life sucks so much as you are on your own in life. There is quite a difference. Kierkegaard argued that even a Christian is alone to
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 2, 2006
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        On Jan 01, 2006, at 16:56, John Meyer wrote:

        > The whole thing is, the main point of existentialism seems to be "Life
        > sucks,
        > so choose your path cause nobody else or no force is going to do it
        > for you."
        > Am I right, or am I really missing the point?

        It is not that life "sucks" so much as "you are on your own" in life.
        There is quite a difference. Kierkegaard argued that even a Christian
        is alone to make decisions, doubting that God was going to stand at
        your side and offer you daily advice. Sartre went further and argued
        that there is nothing, no meaning at all, beyond the individual. You
        are not only on your own, but this is it -- the one shot trip to be all
        you want or as little as you want.

        Total freedom. It's a lot to grasp, but it isn't meant to be easy. The
        easy route is to adopt a strict cultural or religious ethical system,
        follow the letter of the law, and find your meaning in the rules
        created by other people (or whatever you believe created those rules).
        Most people want to be given rules because it's much easier.

        I like some rules, I admit, because then I know what is expected of me.
        I also hate rules that restrict my freedoms. I have to decide which
        rules make sense, then. I pick and choose. We all do. If anyone tell
        you that he or she never breaks a law or rule, that person is lying.
        Existentialists would say that all rules are a personal choice -- the
        trick is admitting this to yourself. Most people would never admit they
        are free to break the rules but choose not to.

        Enjoy the list.

        - C. S. Wyatt
        I am what I am at this moment, not what I was and certainly not all
        that I shall be.
        http://www.tameri.com - Tameri Guide for Writers
        http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist - The Existential Primer
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