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Weapons of Love

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  • louise
    TO ILBRA [from the Persian] Ilbra! Beauty s bondmen are striken with blue eyes: Thine, when I first beheld thee, were black, O Ilbra. I admired their silken
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 2, 2006
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      TO ILBRA

      [from the Persian]

      Ilbra! Beauty's bondmen are striken with blue eyes:
      Thine, when I first beheld thee, were black, O Ilbra.
      I admired their silken lashes, like the cedars and cypresses
      On the edge of those hills afar off there, white with snow.
      The dimple of thy lips, half shaded by ever-blooming roses,
      Open and distinct, shewed candour and hospitality.
      I looked again on thy eyes, O Ilbra,
      Till mine became dim*, and thine blue*.


      Walter Savage Landor. 'Translations, Imitations, etc.'
      My 1969 Methuen edition of his complete works carries this poem in
      volume 15, but the contents page refers to volume 3, presumably with
      reference to the original edition published by Chapman & Hall,
      between 1927 and 1936.

      Louise
    • Eliza Rodriguez
      Just delightful. Is the poem, To the Nightingale also included in this edition? I found a great website in which many of Hafiz poetry is posted in
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 2, 2006
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        Just delightful. Is the poem, "To the Nightingale" also included in this edition? I found a great website in which many of Hafiz' poetry is posted in English:

        http://www.hafizonlove.com/divan/index.htm

        And in my research for a book containing the Nightingale poem I spent hours at the library seeking more information about the work of Walter Savage Landor. I came back home with the poem he wrote, "Gebir." But, in Landor's "Gebir" I miss the short spontaneity of Hafiz.

        Thank you so much for your sharing of these interesting parts of culture. I feel intellectually enriched and sincerely grateful.

        Eliza

        louise <hecubatoher@...> wrote: TO ILBRA

        [from the Persian]

        Ilbra! Beauty's bondmen are striken with blue eyes:
        Thine, when I first beheld thee, were black, O Ilbra.
        I admired their silken lashes, like the cedars and cypresses
        On the edge of those hills afar off there, white with snow.
        The dimple of thy lips, half shaded by ever-blooming roses,
        Open and distinct, shewed candour and hospitality.
        I looked again on thy eyes, O Ilbra,
        Till mine became dim*, and thine blue*.


        Walter Savage Landor. 'Translations, Imitations, etc.'
        My 1969 Methuen edition of his complete works carries this poem in
        volume 15, but the contents page refers to volume 3, presumably with
        reference to the original edition published by Chapman & Hall,
        between 1927 and 1936.

        Louise





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      • Eliza Rodriguez
        I also tried to define the term ilbra through various sources, including the Columbia University Encyclopedia Iranica, and Websters, and Google. Well, not
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2006
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          I also tried to define the term "ilbra" through various sources, including the Columbia University Encyclopedia Iranica, and Websters, and Google. Well, not once I was able to find a definition to the ilbra's concept. Can you help? Who is Ilbra? Is it a super ideal that awaits the poet's discovery?

          Eliza

          louise <hecubatoher@...> wrote: TO ILBRA

          [from the Persian]

          Ilbra! Beauty's bondmen are striken with blue eyes:
          Thine, when I first beheld thee, were black, O Ilbra.
          I admired their silken lashes, like the cedars and cypresses
          On the edge of those hills afar off there, white with snow.
          The dimple of thy lips, half shaded by ever-blooming roses,
          Open and distinct, shewed candour and hospitality.
          I looked again on thy eyes, O Ilbra,
          Till mine became dim*, and thine blue*.


          Walter Savage Landor. 'Translations, Imitations, etc.'
          My 1969 Methuen edition of his complete works carries this poem in
          volume 15, but the contents page refers to volume 3, presumably with
          reference to the original edition published by Chapman & Hall,
          between 1927 and 1936.

          Louise





          Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

          Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



          SPONSORED LINKS
          Philosophy book Merleau-ponty

          ---------------------------------
          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


          Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


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