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  • louise
    TO THE NIGHTINGALE [from the Persian] Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness, Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper. I heard thee
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 30, 2005
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      TO THE NIGHTINGALE

      [from the Persian]

      Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness,
      Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper.
      I heard thee repeatedly call the Fairies,
      And saw them array with pearls the eyelashes of Ilbra.
      For she pitied thy plaint from the shadiness of our loves.
      I said to Ilbra, "*these are my pearls*;"
      She smiled, and showered them into my bosom.
      The dove was over her, the rainbow on her cheek.
      The pearls of Ilbra are now my* pearls.
      Sweet nightingale, may also thy passion prosper.


      W.S.Landor, "Poems from the Arabic and Persian".


      Yes, how Nietzschean, contemporary, is this word, 'passion'. It is
      specific to the individual. Pertaining to intellect, character,
      personality, sensuality, sensibility, and so on, the infinity of
      forms. How unreasonable, how pure, the longings of Plato, to see
      those Forms immutable and hence incarnate, politically, the
      unrealised despair of the Republican idealist. Seems almost as
      though, Plato never existed. He simply was. What a dreamer, what a
      writer. I don't want a symposium in Heaven, I don't want
      Christmas. Just give me food, and music. Friendship comes to those
      who wait.

      Louise
    • Eliza Rodriguez
      Thank you Louise, for this beautiful exerpt. I tried to find this book in the search engine of Amazon, with no success. Could you share the ISBN number of
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 30, 2005
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        Thank you Louise, for this beautiful exerpt. I tried to find this book in the search engine of Amazon, with no success. Could you share the ISBN number of the book? Thanks again.

        Eliza

        louise <hecubatoher@...> wrote: TO THE NIGHTINGALE

        [from the Persian]

        Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness,
        Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper.
        I heard thee repeatedly call the Fairies,
        And saw them array with pearls the eyelashes of Ilbra.
        For she pitied thy plaint from the shadiness of our loves.
        I said to Ilbra, "*these are my pearls*;"
        She smiled, and showered them into my bosom.
        The dove was over her, the rainbow on her cheek.
        The pearls of Ilbra are now my* pearls.
        Sweet nightingale, may also thy passion prosper.


        W.S.Landor, "Poems from the Arabic and Persian".


        Yes, how Nietzschean, contemporary, is this word, 'passion'. It is
        specific to the individual. Pertaining to intellect, character,
        personality, sensuality, sensibility, and so on, the infinity of
        forms. How unreasonable, how pure, the longings of Plato, to see
        those Forms immutable and hence incarnate, politically, the
        unrealised despair of the Republican idealist. Seems almost as
        though, Plato never existed. He simply was. What a dreamer, what a
        writer. I don't want a symposium in Heaven, I don't want
        Christmas. Just give me food, and music. Friendship comes to those
        who wait.

        Louise





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      • louise
        ... this book in the search engine of Amazon, with no success. Could you share the ISBN number of the book? Thanks again. ... ... my earlier messages
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 30, 2005
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          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, Eliza Rodriguez
          <mountaingrizbear@y...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you Louise, for this beautiful exerpt. I tried to find
          this book in the search engine of Amazon, with no success. Could
          you share the ISBN number of the book? Thanks again.
          >
          > Eliza


          ... my earlier messages 37267/8 explain how i have excerpted this
          poem. inside the first of this fifteen volume set is given:

          SBN/416 32510 6/33.

          i fear this may not help you. the purchase was made over twenty
          years ago. if you were really determined to obtain an edition of,
          or including, these translations/imitations, an online second-hand
          book dealer might be able to help you. let me see, looking in some
          old notes:

          bibliophile.net
          abebooks.com

          regards,
          louise


          >
          > louise <hecubatoher@y...> wrote: TO THE NIGHTINGALE
          >
          > [from the Persian]
          >
          > Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness,
          > Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper.
          > I heard thee repeatedly call the Fairies,
          > And saw them array with pearls the eyelashes of Ilbra.
          > For she pitied thy plaint from the shadiness of our loves.
          > I said to Ilbra, "*these are my pearls*;"
          > She smiled, and showered them into my bosom.
          > The dove was over her, the rainbow on her cheek.
          > The pearls of Ilbra are now my* pearls.
          > Sweet nightingale, may also thy passion prosper.
          >
          >
          > W.S.Landor, "Poems from the Arabic and Persian".
        • Eliza Rodriguez
          Thank you so much. I have seen that some of the most comprehensive books of Middle Eastern poetry are very expensive and mostly out of print. It is too
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 30, 2005
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            Thank you so much. I have seen that some of the most comprehensive books of Middle Eastern poetry are very expensive and mostly out of print. It is too bad, that the world is missing this beauty all along. I will give a look into your past postings regarding this topic.

            Eliza

            louise <hecubatoher@...> wrote: --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, Eliza Rodriguez
            <mountaingrizbear@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you Louise, for this beautiful exerpt. I tried to find
            this book in the search engine of Amazon, with no success. Could
            you share the ISBN number of the book? Thanks again.
            >
            > Eliza


            ... my earlier messages 37267/8 explain how i have excerpted this
            poem. inside the first of this fifteen volume set is given:

            SBN/416 32510 6/33.

            i fear this may not help you. the purchase was made over twenty
            years ago. if you were really determined to obtain an edition of,
            or including, these translations/imitations, an online second-hand
            book dealer might be able to help you. let me see, looking in some
            old notes:

            bibliophile.net
            abebooks.com

            regards,
            louise


            >
            > louise <hecubatoher@y...> wrote: TO THE NIGHTINGALE
            >
            > [from the Persian]
            >
            > Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness,
            > Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper.
            > I heard thee repeatedly call the Fairies,
            > And saw them array with pearls the eyelashes of Ilbra.
            > For she pitied thy plaint from the shadiness of our loves.
            > I said to Ilbra, "*these are my pearls*;"
            > She smiled, and showered them into my bosom.
            > The dove was over her, the rainbow on her cheek.
            > The pearls of Ilbra are now my* pearls.
            > Sweet nightingale, may also thy passion prosper.
            >
            >
            > W.S.Landor, "Poems from the Arabic and Persian".







            Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

            Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



            SPONSORED LINKS
            Philosophy book Merleau-ponty

            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------






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          • Eliza Rodriguez
            Louise, I kept trying to find this book everywhere I could. Finally, it appears in two UK s original versions, one for 950 pounds and the other for 2,600
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 2, 2006
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              Louise,

              I kept trying to find this book everywhere I could. Finally, it appears in two UK's original versions, one for 950 pounds and the other for 2,600 pounds. Please keep me informed if you find some cheaper options around. Meanwhile, I would be pleased if you continue quoting from your rare book for the rest of us.

              Eliza

              louise <hecubatoher@...> wrote: TO THE NIGHTINGALE

              [from the Persian]

              Candid with thy modesty, grateful with thy shyness,
              Sweet nightingale, soon may thy passion prosper.
              I heard thee repeatedly call the Fairies,
              And saw them array with pearls the eyelashes of Ilbra.
              For she pitied thy plaint from the shadiness of our loves.
              I said to Ilbra, "*these are my pearls*;"
              She smiled, and showered them into my bosom.
              The dove was over her, the rainbow on her cheek.
              The pearls of Ilbra are now my* pearls.
              Sweet nightingale, may also thy passion prosper.


              W.S.Landor, "Poems from the Arabic and Persian".


              Yes, how Nietzschean, contemporary, is this word, 'passion'. It is
              specific to the individual. Pertaining to intellect, character,
              personality, sensuality, sensibility, and so on, the infinity of
              forms. How unreasonable, how pure, the longings of Plato, to see
              those Forms immutable and hence incarnate, politically, the
              unrealised despair of the Republican idealist. Seems almost as
              though, Plato never existed. He simply was. What a dreamer, what a
              writer. I don't want a symposium in Heaven, I don't want
              Christmas. Just give me food, and music. Friendship comes to those
              who wait.

              Louise





              Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

              Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



              SPONSORED LINKS
              Philosophy book Merleau-ponty

              ---------------------------------
              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


              Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

              To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


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