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  • louise
    You know, it never occurred to me before now, the difference in accounts of man and woman creation in Genesis 2. Availing myself with pleasure, the WT 1530
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 29, 2005
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      You know, it never occurred to me before now, the difference in
      accounts of man and woman creation in Genesis 2.

      Availing myself with pleasure, the WT 1530 Pentateuch,
      Tyndale's Old Testament [modern spelling],
      ed. & introd. by David Daniell. Yale U.P. 1992.

      ... the Lord God shope man, even of the mould of the earth and
      breathed into his face the breath of life. So man was made a living
      soul.

      No similar process recorded in case of nifty rib-wizardry.

      That reminds me of this Greek word, psyche*, which is used, once, in
      the Odyssey, to denote the life of a pig, departing the flesh, and
      this is the same psyche all human beings are deemed to possess.
      These are the eternal children I speak of, the lands around the
      Aegean Sea.

      Borrowing now from ...

      E.R. Dodds, The Greeks and the Irrational.
      Chapter V, The Greek Shamans and the Origin of Puritanism.
      University of California Press, 1951.

      ~ In fifth-century Attic writers, as in their Ionian predecessors,
      the "self" which is denoted by the word psyche* is normally the
      emotional rather than the rational self. The psyche* is spoken of
      as the seat of courage, of passion, of pity, of anxiety, of animal
      appetite, but before Plato seldom if ever as the seat of reason; its
      range is broadly that of the Homeric thumos*. ~ [pp138-9]

      Our professor now expatiates concerning the shamans of ancient
      Thrace and Scythia, modern Siberia, Aristeas, Sophocles, Cretan
      mystery, Pythagoras, Empedocles, and on to the magical self, the
      singing head ... Orpheus, Norse mythology, Irish tradition.

      ~ Orpheus, however, is one thing, Orphism quite another. But I must
      confess that I know very little about early Orphism, and the more I
      read about it the more my knowledge diminishes. ~ [p147]

      Now then, to cut a longer story shorter, Plato's depiction of Orphic
      lore, that the body is the soul's prison, kept there by the gods
      until it has purged its guilt, did not find favour with your average
      fifth-century Hellene.

      ~ I should suppose that for people who took it seriously what
      lay "dead" within the body was neither the reason nor the empirical
      man, but an "occult" self, Pindar's "image of life", which is
      indestructible but can function only in the exceptional conditions
      of sleep or trance. ... [this] he called, not "psyche*"
      but "daemon". ~ [p153]

      Well, that's enough for me to be going on with anyway ...

      Louise
      ... your homely Dionysian
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