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Re: Nietzsche: the cheerful black cloud

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  • trop_de_simones
    Hi K, I have a basically cheerful disposition. When I am not able* to be cheerful I often condemn myself, forgetting that it is okay to be myself, my other
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 4, 2005
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      Hi K,

      I have a basically cheerful disposition. When I am not able* to be
      cheerful I often condemn myself, forgetting that it is okay to be
      myself, my other self too.

      The many values you mention are contingent upon our unique abilities
      which are usually genetically predisposed, environmental nurture,
      environmental pathology, etc. But the ability to ovecome our lack of
      motivation or interest in acquiring such values is also contingent.

      Perhaps Winnie the Pooh with his cheerful little black cloud and
      Charlie Brown and his nemesis Lucy Van Pelt are about as close as we
      happier folks can expect things to be, at least in this neighborhood.

      We are capable of that which we are able to capable of being able!!
      And sometimes, we just do not care. That is okay too, right?

      Philosophy loses its mission when it claims we should all be of the
      same cloth. How boring is that? How impossible? Just how long of a
      thread would that have to be?

      Simone

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "jkneilson" <jkneilson@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Thus cheerfulness is usually a psychological
      > state born out of experience and not a philosphical platform upon
      > which we order
      > experience like someone conducting an orchaestra.
      >
      > [...]
      >
      > So: is that a more or less "knowledgable" assessment of
      > Nietzsche's "cheerful"
      > human condition?
      >
      > # # #
      >
      > This is a great take on cheerfulness. It got me thinking. With the
      > death of God, we are indeed free from deontological duties. But we
      > still have duties, if only to ourselves and other noble-minded
      > spirits. In fact, a whole range of values figure prominently in
      > Nietzsche's ethical assessment of "good" and "bad" people. These
      > values include integrity, humor, fearlessness, optimism,
      > cheerfulness, and self-mastery. Above all, Nietzsche values a
      > strong, powerful will, a healthy will. My question is this, why be
      > moral (in Nietzsche's sense)? Why be good? Why is it better to be a
      > healthy Greek than a sick Christian?
      >
      > Normatively impaired, K
      >
      > P.S.: If the source of normativity in Nietzsche is a strong,
      healthy
      > will, perhaps cheerfulness is more than a psychological state.
      Maybe
      > it's a "philosophical platform," from which we can regulate
      > (or "orchestrate") our ideas, our beliefs, our lives.
      >
      > Just a thought.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > K
      >
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