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Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns

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  • eduard at home
    Sometimes a well placed witticism can serve to emphasize a point. In the extreme, it may appear to be funny, but there also is a certain clarity and a note
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Sometimes a well placed witticism can serve to emphasize a point. In the extreme, it may appear to be funny, but there also is a certain clarity and a note which gets to heart of a question or situation. How many of whatever to screw in a light bulb can apply to all sorts of things.

      Being funny is a skill. Some are adapt at the bon mot, others at stand-up comedy. For myself, I find that I simply can't do the latter. When I'm in a group and the jokes are being said around the table, I usually pass on my turn, since I will only screw up whatever I might hope to bring forth.

      eduard
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Aija Veldre Beldavs
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 12:51 AM
      Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns



      On Sun, 31 Jul 2005, dave minogue wrote:

      > When we look back through history many of the key figures had a keen
      > wit, eg leonardo da vinci, charles chaplin, shakespear, einstein,
      > stephen hawkins to name but a few.

      gotta add Mark Twain.
      to say nothing of lesser folk on the net coming up with new variants of
      the Evil Overlord, how many to screw in a lighbulb, you have two cows...
      humor is all around, the absurd can be approached with humor.

      together with the headman, wise woman, chief, assembly of elders or gods,
      or any other authority figure or the better folk came the trickster,
      joker, and fool to balance, offset, and set limits to the normative,
      formal, authoritative, elite, or else, at least at certain designated
      times to vent tension that high levels of restriction and control create.

      obviously the clown had to be pretty clever to know what one could get
      away with. otoh it's easier to deconstruct by making fun of something,
      than to create, and a good part of humor is dependent on someone else
      constructing or being something.

      there are different functions for humor, thus different theories. for
      starters, laughing (not the same as humor) as simple physiological release
      of stress, relief when the situation isn't mirthfully funny, but full of
      tension. humor may be dangerous, ambiguous, absurd, out of place, a
      breaking of frame, just plain strange but not so alarming that the fight
      or flight response is triggered instead.

      much of archaic male humor of warrior societies was aggressive hostility
      directed at others for the purpose of psychological abuse - softening up
      and diminishing the kill as before combat, while bonding the in-group.

      humor and bonding at the expense of someone else...

      in my dissertation about Latvian women's archaic ritual song wars,
      however, i elaborated on the purpose being the opposite, through abuse
      ritually creating a co-operative bond between two discrete groups that
      could also be potentially hostile.

      the emergence of the ability to diminish threat by humor, the ability
      to laugh also at oneself, to manipulate it to a greater range of goals...

      > lectures on how to be funny in colleges? why is it that the funniest
      > are also the saddest?

      but you've seen the two Greek masks of comedy and tragedy in pairs,
      haven't you?

      > its so important to our being yet it is something that is marginalised
      > well beyond its merit.

      the ancient Greek prioritization of tragedy as high culture and comedy as
      that of the masses continues and persists.

      > why is it that comedians make more sense than politicians?

      it's easier to make fun of something than to offer a working
      alternative.:)

      but pairing comedy wih the serious is a reminder of human hubris, to place
      limits on taking oneself too seriously. or maybe it's to discourage
      humans from setting up their different humorless idols.:)

      aija


      Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

      Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



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    • dave minogue
      Perhaps mark twain should be added to the list, i dont know much about him, but its an ongoing list for sure. i cant tell whether my point is being fully
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Perhaps mark twain should be added to the list, i dont know much about
        him, but its an ongoing list for sure. i cant tell whether my point is
        being fully understood or articulated properly or if its being dismissed,
        if it is being dismissed it probably emphasises my point somewhat. i
        think the root of what i'm getting at can be seen in aija's last
        paragraph "pairing comedy with the serious....different humourless
        idols". it is through comedy where we build the strongest of human
        relationships- if you can let your most embarrassing moments be recalled
        and exploited at your expense and do the same for friends isnt there a
        strong underlying trust behind this? to be that open about sensitive
        issues and deal with them in such a way not only takes maturity but balls
        too. sure it may be deconstruction but isnt that the best way to rebuild?
        knowing full well that i'm going to sound like an after school special
        but couldnt social boundaries be broken if people learned to critic
        themselves and others in a more constructive way or in essense couldnt we
        save the world through laughter? if institutions, individuals,
        communities found a way to be more funny...(i know its sounding kinda
        lame) but if this did infact happen wouldnt a balance be found? if
        laughter is the best medicine how come we dont listen to ourselves? if
        laughter or comedy is so important to social situations why is it often
        met with such resistance?

        if comedy is in essense picking on the weakest of the pack is it not
        aimed then at strenghtening the pack in an all inclusive way? is this not
        a more constructive way than say ethnic cleansing (i know thats the
        extreme)? speaking from expierence i have found that a cheeky smile and a
        wink can get you out of trouble, perhaps this is just because i'm irish,
        who knows? but then the question is, what is it about giving a cheeky
        smile a wink and being irish that can reduce social conflict
        considerably? it cant simply be as a result of my nationality so
        therefore it falls upon the cheeky smile and a wink (just to note, a
        cheeky smile and a wink can also work on me). there is something within
        humour that opens us up and makes us more tolerant but it is not being
        utilised by society or recognised for its abilities to cure, bond or
        speak to the masses in a cohereant way. plus its damn entertaining. i
        realise life cant be a circus but thats not what i'm getting at, i'm
        talking about a balance and a recognition of the potential comedy has.

        i'm well aware that my theory here is extremely idealistic but as i said
        in my first post i havent constructed my theory properly as of yet.
        nobody makes us cry like a clown makes us cry.

        dave

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "eduard at home"
        To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns
        Date: Mon, 01 Aug 2005 03:28:14 -0400

        Sometimes a well placed witticism can serve to emphasize a point. In the
        extreme, it may appear to be funny, but there also is a certain clarity
        and a note which gets to heart of a question or situation. How many of
        whatever to screw in a light bulb can apply to all sorts of things.

        Being funny is a skill. Some are adapt at the bon mot, others at
        stand-up comedy. For myself, I find that I simply can't do the latter.
        When I'm in a group and the jokes are being said around the table, I
        usually pass on my turn, since I will only screw up whatever I might hope
        to bring forth.

        eduard
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Aija Veldre Beldavs
        To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 12:51 AM
        Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns



        On Sun, 31 Jul 2005, dave minogue wrote:

        > When we look back through history many of the key figures had a keen
        > wit, eg leonardo da vinci, charles chaplin, shakespear, einstein,
        > stephen hawkins to name but a few.

        gotta add Mark Twain.
        to say nothing of lesser folk on the net coming up with new variants of
        the Evil Overlord, how many to screw in a lighbulb, you have two cows...
        humor is all around, the absurd can be approached with humor.

        together with the headman, wise woman, chief, assembly of elders or gods,
        or any other authority figure or the better folk came the trickster,
        joker, and fool to balance, offset, and set limits to the normative,
        formal, authoritative, elite, or else, at least at certain designated
        times to vent tension that high levels of restriction and control create.

        obviously the clown had to be pretty clever to know what one could get
        away with. otoh it's easier to deconstruct by making fun of something,
        than to create, and a good part of humor is dependent on someone else
        constructing or being something.

        there are different functions for humor, thus different theories. for
        starters, laughing (not the same as humor) as simple physiological
        release
        of stress, relief when the situation isn't mirthfully funny, but full of
        tension. humor may be dangerous, ambiguous, absurd, out of place, a
        breaking of frame, just plain strange but not so alarming that the fight
        or flight response is triggered instead.

        much of archaic male humor of warrior societies was aggressive hostility
        directed at others for the purpose of psychological abuse - softening up
        and diminishing the kill as before combat, while bonding the in-group.

        humor and bonding at the expense of someone else...

        in my dissertation about Latvian women's archaic ritual song wars,
        however, i elaborated on the purpose being the opposite, through abuse
        ritually creating a co-operative bond between two discrete groups that
        could also be potentially hostile.

        the emergence of the ability to diminish threat by humor, the ability
        to laugh also at oneself, to manipulate it to a greater range of goals...

        > lectures on how to be funny in colleges? why is it that the funniest
        > are also the saddest?

        but you've seen the two Greek masks of comedy and tragedy in pairs,
        haven't you?

        > its so important to our being yet it is something that is marginalised
        > well beyond its merit.

        the ancient Greek prioritization of tragedy as high culture and comedy as
        that of the masses continues and persists.

        > why is it that comedians make more sense than politicians?

        it's easier to make fun of something than to offer a working
        alternative.:)

        but pairing comedy wih the serious is a reminder of human hubris, to
        place
        limits on taking oneself too seriously. or maybe it's to discourage
        humans from setting up their different humorless idols.:)

        aija


        Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

        Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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        existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

        Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



        SPONSORED LINKS

        Existentialism philosophy Philosophy book Existentialism
        Merleau-ponty Philosophy


        ------------------------------------------------------------------------

        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        * Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

        * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.


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      • eduard at home
        Perhaps Mark Twain could be added to the list. However, I have the feeling that he would be too dry for today s tastes. But, then what do I know?? As to
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 1, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Perhaps Mark Twain could be added to the list. However, I have the feeling that he would be too dry for today's tastes. But, then what do I know??

          As to politics and humour, I think it would be very dangerous for a politician to try to be humourous. I never really works out, since there is always someone who might be offended. I recall at least the incident [not his name or department] of a US federal secretary who got canned for trying to explain how many minorities and challenged people he had on his staff. It is usually known as "insensitivity".

          eduard at home
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: dave minogue
          To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 9:12 AM
          Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns


          Perhaps mark twain should be added to the list, i dont know much about
          him, but its an ongoing list for sure. i cant tell whether my point is
          being fully understood or articulated properly or if its being dismissed,
          if it is being dismissed it probably emphasises my point somewhat. i
          think the root of what i'm getting at can be seen in aija's last
          paragraph "pairing comedy with the serious....different humourless
          idols". it is through comedy where we build the strongest of human
          relationships- if you can let your most embarrassing moments be recalled
          and exploited at your expense and do the same for friends isnt there a
          strong underlying trust behind this? to be that open about sensitive
          issues and deal with them in such a way not only takes maturity but balls
          too. sure it may be deconstruction but isnt that the best way to rebuild?
          knowing full well that i'm going to sound like an after school special
          but couldnt social boundaries be broken if people learned to critic
          themselves and others in a more constructive way or in essense couldnt we
          save the world through laughter? if institutions, individuals,
          communities found a way to be more funny...(i know its sounding kinda
          lame) but if this did infact happen wouldnt a balance be found? if
          laughter is the best medicine how come we dont listen to ourselves? if
          laughter or comedy is so important to social situations why is it often
          met with such resistance?

          if comedy is in essense picking on the weakest of the pack is it not
          aimed then at strenghtening the pack in an all inclusive way? is this not
          a more constructive way than say ethnic cleansing (i know thats the
          extreme)? speaking from expierence i have found that a cheeky smile and a
          wink can get you out of trouble, perhaps this is just because i'm irish,
          who knows? but then the question is, what is it about giving a cheeky
          smile a wink and being irish that can reduce social conflict
          considerably? it cant simply be as a result of my nationality so
          therefore it falls upon the cheeky smile and a wink (just to note, a
          cheeky smile and a wink can also work on me). there is something within
          humour that opens us up and makes us more tolerant but it is not being
          utilised by society or recognised for its abilities to cure, bond or
          speak to the masses in a cohereant way. plus its damn entertaining. i
          realise life cant be a circus but thats not what i'm getting at, i'm
          talking about a balance and a recognition of the potential comedy has.

          i'm well aware that my theory here is extremely idealistic but as i said
          in my first post i havent constructed my theory properly as of yet.
          nobody makes us cry like a clown makes us cry.

          dave

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "eduard at home"
          To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns
          Date: Mon, 01 Aug 2005 03:28:14 -0400

          Sometimes a well placed witticism can serve to emphasize a point. In the
          extreme, it may appear to be funny, but there also is a certain clarity
          and a note which gets to heart of a question or situation. How many of
          whatever to screw in a light bulb can apply to all sorts of things.

          Being funny is a skill. Some are adapt at the bon mot, others at
          stand-up comedy. For myself, I find that I simply can't do the latter.
          When I'm in a group and the jokes are being said around the table, I
          usually pass on my turn, since I will only screw up whatever I might hope
          to bring forth.

          eduard
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Aija Veldre Beldavs
          To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 12:51 AM
          Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns



          On Sun, 31 Jul 2005, dave minogue wrote:

          > When we look back through history many of the key figures had a keen
          > wit, eg leonardo da vinci, charles chaplin, shakespear, einstein,
          > stephen hawkins to name but a few.

          gotta add Mark Twain.
          to say nothing of lesser folk on the net coming up with new variants of
          the Evil Overlord, how many to screw in a lighbulb, you have two cows...
          humor is all around, the absurd can be approached with humor.

          together with the headman, wise woman, chief, assembly of elders or gods,
          or any other authority figure or the better folk came the trickster,
          joker, and fool to balance, offset, and set limits to the normative,
          formal, authoritative, elite, or else, at least at certain designated
          times to vent tension that high levels of restriction and control create.

          obviously the clown had to be pretty clever to know what one could get
          away with. otoh it's easier to deconstruct by making fun of something,
          than to create, and a good part of humor is dependent on someone else
          constructing or being something.

          there are different functions for humor, thus different theories. for
          starters, laughing (not the same as humor) as simple physiological
          release
          of stress, relief when the situation isn't mirthfully funny, but full of
          tension. humor may be dangerous, ambiguous, absurd, out of place, a
          breaking of frame, just plain strange but not so alarming that the fight
          or flight response is triggered instead.

          much of archaic male humor of warrior societies was aggressive hostility
          directed at others for the purpose of psychological abuse - softening up
          and diminishing the kill as before combat, while bonding the in-group.

          humor and bonding at the expense of someone else...

          in my dissertation about Latvian women's archaic ritual song wars,
          however, i elaborated on the purpose being the opposite, through abuse
          ritually creating a co-operative bond between two discrete groups that
          could also be potentially hostile.

          the emergence of the ability to diminish threat by humor, the ability
          to laugh also at oneself, to manipulate it to a greater range of goals...

          > lectures on how to be funny in colleges? why is it that the funniest
          > are also the saddest?

          but you've seen the two Greek masks of comedy and tragedy in pairs,
          haven't you?

          > its so important to our being yet it is something that is marginalised
          > well beyond its merit.

          the ancient Greek prioritization of tragedy as high culture and comedy as
          that of the masses continues and persists.

          > why is it that comedians make more sense than politicians?

          it's easier to make fun of something than to offer a working
          alternative.:)

          but pairing comedy wih the serious is a reminder of human hubris, to
          place
          limits on taking oneself too seriously. or maybe it's to discourage
          humans from setting up their different humorless idols.:)

          aija


          Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

          Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

          a.. Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

          b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

          Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



          SPONSORED LINKS

          Existentialism philosophy Philosophy book Existentialism
          Merleau-ponty Philosophy


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------

          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


          * Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

          * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.


          --------------------------------------------------------------------

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          _______________________________________________
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

          Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

          a.. Visit your group "existlist" on the web.

          b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          existlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • trop_de_simones
          Humor is an important part of life isn t it? Late night talk shows help us to laugh before we fall asleep, well that other activities, if we re so fortunate.
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 1, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            Humor is an important part of life isn't it? Late night talk shows
            help us to laugh before we fall asleep, well that other activities,
            if we're so fortunate. However, this kind of comedy is becoming less
            sensitive and mean spirited. I enjoy the role playing comedians who
            make us question (scepticism?) the status quo, like Sasha Baron-
            Cohen. And forgive any redunancy, but how about the medieval
            jongleur, the trickster of high Japanese cinema, and the masque or
            farce? eduard is right on about politicians and humor: it seems they
            have to apologize for every joke they make. Oh, and Absurd theatre. I
            recall after the 9/11 attacks, it was the routine of humor that
            helped us to feel somewhat normal again.

            Simone

            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, eduard at home <yeoman@v...> wrote:
            > Perhaps Mark Twain could be added to the list. However, I have the
            feeling that he would be too dry for today's tastes. But, then what
            do I know??
            >
            > As to politics and humour, I think it would be very dangerous for a
            politician to try to be humourous. I never really works out, since
            there is always someone who might be offended. I recall at least the
            incident [not his name or department] of a US federal secretary who
            got canned for trying to explain how many minorities and challenged
            people he had on his staff. It is usually known as "insensitivity".
            >
            > eduard at home
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: dave minogue
            > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 9:12 AM
            > Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns
            >
            >
            > Perhaps mark twain should be added to the list, i dont know much
            about
            > him, but its an ongoing list for sure. i cant tell whether my
            point is
            > being fully understood or articulated properly or if its being
            dismissed,
            > if it is being dismissed it probably emphasises my point
            somewhat. i
            > think the root of what i'm getting at can be seen in aija's last
            > paragraph "pairing comedy with the serious....different humourless
            > idols". it is through comedy where we build the strongest of human
            > relationships- if you can let your most embarrassing moments be
            recalled
            > and exploited at your expense and do the same for friends isnt
            there a
            > strong underlying trust behind this? to be that open about
            sensitive
            > issues and deal with them in such a way not only takes maturity
            but balls
            > too. sure it may be deconstruction but isnt that the best way to
            rebuild?
            > knowing full well that i'm going to sound like an after school
            special
            > but couldnt social boundaries be broken if people learned to
            critic
            > themselves and others in a more constructive way or in essense
            couldnt we
            > save the world through laughter? if institutions, individuals,
            > communities found a way to be more funny...(i know its sounding
            kinda
            > lame) but if this did infact happen wouldnt a balance be found?
            if
            > laughter is the best medicine how come we dont listen to
            ourselves? if
            > laughter or comedy is so important to social situations why is it
            often
            > met with such resistance?
            >
            > if comedy is in essense picking on the weakest of the pack is it
            not
            > aimed then at strenghtening the pack in an all inclusive way? is
            this not
            > a more constructive way than say ethnic cleansing (i know thats
            the
            > extreme)? speaking from expierence i have found that a cheeky
            smile and a
            > wink can get you out of trouble, perhaps this is just because i'm
            irish,
            > who knows? but then the question is, what is it about giving a
            cheeky
            > smile a wink and being irish that can reduce social conflict
            > considerably? it cant simply be as a result of my nationality so
            > therefore it falls upon the cheeky smile and a wink (just to
            note, a
            > cheeky smile and a wink can also work on me). there is something
            within
            > humour that opens us up and makes us more tolerant but it is not
            being
            > utilised by society or recognised for its abilities to cure, bond
            or
            > speak to the masses in a cohereant way. plus its damn
            entertaining. i
            > realise life cant be a circus but thats not what i'm getting at,
            i'm
            > talking about a balance and a recognition of the potential comedy
            has.
            >
            > i'm well aware that my theory here is extremely idealistic but as
            i said
            > in my first post i havent constructed my theory properly as of
            yet.
            > nobody makes us cry like a clown makes us cry.
            >
            > dave
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "eduard at home"
            > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns
            > Date: Mon, 01 Aug 2005 03:28:14 -0400
            >
            > Sometimes a well placed witticism can serve to emphasize a
            point. In the
            > extreme, it may appear to be funny, but there also is a certain
            clarity
            > and a note which gets to heart of a question or situation. How
            many of
            > whatever to screw in a light bulb can apply to all sorts of
            things.
            >
            > Being funny is a skill. Some are adapt at the bon mot, others at
            > stand-up comedy. For myself, I find that I simply can't do the
            latter.
            > When I'm in a group and the jokes are being said around the
            table, I
            > usually pass on my turn, since I will only screw up whatever I
            might hope
            > to bring forth.
            >
            > eduard
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Aija Veldre Beldavs
            > To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 12:51 AM
            > Subject: Re: [existlist] Send in the clowns
            >
            >
            >
            > On Sun, 31 Jul 2005, dave minogue wrote:
            >
            > > When we look back through history many of the key figures had a
            keen
            > > wit, eg leonardo da vinci, charles chaplin, shakespear,
            einstein,
            > > stephen hawkins to name but a few.
            >
            > gotta add Mark Twain.
            > to say nothing of lesser folk on the net coming up with new
            variants of
            > the Evil Overlord, how many to screw in a lighbulb, you have two
            cows...
            > humor is all around, the absurd can be approached with humor.
            >
            > together with the headman, wise woman, chief, assembly of elders
            or gods,
            > or any other authority figure or the better folk came the
            trickster,
            > joker, and fool to balance, offset, and set limits to the
            normative,
            > formal, authoritative, elite, or else, at least at certain
            designated
            > times to vent tension that high levels of restriction and control
            create.
            >
            > obviously the clown had to be pretty clever to know what one
            could get
            > away with. otoh it's easier to deconstruct by making fun of
            something,
            > than to create, and a good part of humor is dependent on someone
            else
            > constructing or being something.
            >
            > there are different functions for humor, thus different
            theories. for
            > starters, laughing (not the same as humor) as simple physiological
            > release
            > of stress, relief when the situation isn't mirthfully funny, but
            full of
            > tension. humor may be dangerous, ambiguous, absurd, out of
            place, a
            > breaking of frame, just plain strange but not so alarming that
            the fight
            > or flight response is triggered instead.
            >
            > much of archaic male humor of warrior societies was aggressive
            hostility
            > directed at others for the purpose of psychological abuse -
            softening up
            > and diminishing the kill as before combat, while bonding the in-
            group.
            >
            > humor and bonding at the expense of someone else...
            >
            > in my dissertation about Latvian women's archaic ritual song wars,
            > however, i elaborated on the purpose being the opposite, through
            abuse
            > ritually creating a co-operative bond between two discrete groups
            that
            > could also be potentially hostile.
            >
            > the emergence of the ability to diminish threat by humor, the
            ability
            > to laugh also at oneself, to manipulate it to a greater range of
            goals...
            >
            > > lectures on how to be funny in colleges? why is it that the
            funniest
            > > are also the saddest?
            >
            > but you've seen the two Greek masks of comedy and tragedy in
            pairs,
            > haven't you?
            >
            > > its so important to our being yet it is something that is
            marginalised
            > > well beyond its merit.
            >
            > the ancient Greek prioritization of tragedy as high culture and
            comedy as
            > that of the masses continues and persists.
            >
            > > why is it that comedians make more sense than politicians?
            >
            > it's easier to make fun of something than to offer a working
            > alternative.:)
            >
            > but pairing comedy wih the serious is a reminder of human hubris,
            to
            > place
            > limits on taking oneself too seriously. or maybe it's to
            discourage
            > humans from setting up their different humorless idols.:)
            >
            > aija
            >
            >
            > Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining
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          • eduard at home
            Medieval jongleurs must have been something to see. Though, I suppose you needed to be up there at least at the knight level to get into the castle to see it.
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 1, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Medieval jongleurs must have been something to see. Though, I suppose you needed to be up there at least at the knight level to get into the castle to see it. I would suspect that there would have been a lot of comedians amongst the serfs. Like the guy who pretends he slips on a cow paddy. But then a lot of comedy was visceral. Like throwing a tomato at the prisoner in the pillory ... great fun during the evening walk. ha ha ha ....

              And then there are the childrens' fun poems like "Ring around the Rosie" which describes dying from Bubonic Plague.

              eduard at home
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: trop_de_simones
              To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 2:02 PM
              Subject: [existlist] Re: Send in the clowns


              Humor is an important part of life isn't it? Late night talk shows
              help us to laugh before we fall asleep, well that other activities,
              if we're so fortunate. However, this kind of comedy is becoming less
              sensitive and mean spirited. I enjoy the role playing comedians who
              make us question (scepticism?) the status quo, like Sasha Baron-
              Cohen. And forgive any redunancy, but how about the medieval
              jongleur, the trickster of high Japanese cinema, and the masque or
              farce? eduard is right on about politicians and humor: it seems they
              have to apologize for every joke they make. Oh, and Absurd theatre. I
              recall after the 9/11 attacks, it was the routine of humor that
              helped us to feel somewhat normal again.

              Simone


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