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RE: [existlist] Re: refuse to value the refuse

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  • alan
    See when you say “I happen to think we have free will, so ... what you or I think or like has nothing to do with TRUTH OR FACT. ... From:
    Message 1 of 13 , May 1, 2005
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      See when you say “I happen to think we have free will, so
      >any notion that we are nothing but determined masses of neurons
      >bothers me. There are too many environmental and internal factors to
      >be determined precisely.” <-- you are engaging in a tendentious argument,
      what you or I think or like has nothing to do with TRUTH OR FACT.

      >



      -----Original Message-----
      From: existlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:existlist@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf
      Of ken
      Sent: Friday, 29 April 2005 8:44 PM
      To: existlist@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [existlist] Re: refuse to value the refuse

      C. S. Wyatt wrote:

      >I suggest Scientific American: MIND. It's a great magazine dedicated
      >to the science of the human brain. The Web addy is sciammind.com, I think.
      >
      >Indeed, the more we know about the mind, the greater problems with
      >notions of "Free Will" are. I happen to think we have free will, so
      >any notion that we are nothing but determined masses of neurons
      >bothers me. There are too many environmental and internal factors to
      >be determined precisely.
      >
      >I still believe we choose what to do, and what not to do. Still, the
      >magazine's articles and suggested journal readings have me wondering
      >where the lines are between the brain and the abstract mind.
      >
      >- CSW
      >
      >

      A few decades ago Merleau-Ponty put together a work which quite
      thoroughly takes apart physical/material notions of the mind's or
      brain's role in consciousness. Although the text of
      _The_Structure_of_Behavior_ isn't on the web, it's still available for sale.

      --
      A lot of us are working harder than we want, at things we don't like to
      do. Why? ...In order to afford the sort of existence we don't care to live.
      -- Bradford Angier



      Please support the Existential Primer... dedicated to explaining nothing!

      Home Page: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist



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    • louise
      Alan: [quoting CSW] See when you say I happen to think we have free will, so any notion that we are nothing but determined masses of neurons bothers me.
      Message 2 of 13 , May 1, 2005
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        Alan: [quoting CSW]
        See when you say "I happen to think we have free will, so
        any notion that we are nothing but determined masses of neurons
        bothers me. There are too many environmental and internal factors to
        be determined precisely." <-- you are engaging in a tendentious
        argument, what you or I think or like has nothing to do with TRUTH OR
        FACT.

        This wasn't an argument, I think, it was the statement of a hunch,
        given the context. If someone said this at a dinner-party, one might
        say it is simply the statement of a preference. Since this is a
        mailing-list dedicated to existentialism and related literature, I see
        Chris's comments as one possible starting-point for an argument,
        which, as you say, must separate itself from personal likings in order
        to claim the reliability of truth or fact. Looking at the overnight
        posts, I'm not quite so optimistic that the scientific faction here
        can jostle along happily with those like Nolan and myself who value
        psychological and literary approaches. However, I intend to continue
        to try. Right now, though, I am struggling with the sheer effort of
        believing just how intelligent people manage so to value evasion and
        discourtesy whilst refusing to look at what they are valuing. For me,
        there is something of a 'new start' feel about this list at present.
        Another poetic illusion, perhaps, like so much of human thought. The
        integrity of the continuing attempt is what matters. Just a brief
        pennyworth for now.

        Louise
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