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  • louise
    Hear therefore, all ye who care for the work of a great poet, what I intend to inspire Homer to do. I intend to make him give a special and peculiar kind of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 31, 2005
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      "Hear therefore, all ye who care for the work of a great poet, what
      I intend to inspire Homer to do. I intend to make him give a
      special and peculiar kind of vital life to the elements among whom
      both mortals and immortals have their being; to such things as earth
      and air and fire and water; to such things as rivers and seas and
      rocks and stones and sands. O yes! and I have resolved to include
      all manner of objects familiar to ordinary men and women and indeed
      created again and again by their own hands. ..........
      ......... In the process of encountering these so-called inanimate
      objects, often in complete absent-mindedness and mental abstraction,
      ordinary mortals, living ordinary lives upon earth, do possess the
      power of creating actual consciousness. ..............
      And I alone, the shining Aether, am an accomplice in this process,
      for I alone have the power of passing through every form and shape
      which matter, consciously or unconsciously, has taken. In fact I
      can pass through the smallest atoms of matter. I can even pass
      between and around the still smaller particles that compose such
      atoms. I, the Aether, have watched from its beginning the amazing
      enterprise of Homer, the enterprise of one who is now a prematurely
      old man nearly blinded by his heroic struggle to visualise the
      actual background of every scene of his tremendous poem. .......
      ................ Hear me, great Ouranos above! Hear me, great
      Gaia beneath! It is I and I only who have helped all the poets who
      have ever existed to catch this reality. To me the Past and the
      Future are nothing but stalks and leaves; and to me the Present is
      nothing but a blooming rose-petal with a bitter thorn. As for
      Eternity, it is to me no better than a puff of stinking wind from
      the backside of a monstrous chimaera of Space. O my Homer, let
      Moira guide you to your end and when the Spinners have spun your
      fate let Keer give you everlasting peace!"

      From the first chapter, 'The Aether Speaks', in
      'Homer and the Aether' by John Cowper Powys.
      Macdonald & Co., London. 1959

      What's this then, rhetoric??

      Louise
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