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a view of melancholy, anno 1621

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  • louise
    ..... Suspicion* and jealousy* are general symptoms: they are commonly distrustful, timorous, apt to mistake, and amplify, *facile irascibiles*, testy,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 13, 2005
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      " ..... Suspicion* and jealousy* are general symptoms: they are
      commonly distrustful, timorous, apt to mistake, and amplify, *facile
      irascibiles*, testy, pettish, peevish, and ready to snarl upon every
      small occasion, *cum amicissimis* [with their greatest friends], and
      without a cause, *datum vel non datum*, it will be *scandalum
      acceptum* [given or not given, offence will be taken]. If they
      speak in jest, he takes it in good earnest. If they be not saluted,
      invited, consulted with, called to counsel, &c. or that any respect,
      small compliment, or ceremony be omitted, they think themselves
      neglected and contemned: for a time that tortures them. If two talk
      together, discourse, whisper, jest, or tell a tale in general, he
      thinks presently they mean him, applies all to himself, *de se putat
      omnia dici*. Or if they talk with him, he is ready to misconstrue
      every word they speak, and interpret it to the worst; he cannot
      endure any man to look steadily on him, speak to him almost, laugh,
      jest, or be familiar, or hem, or point, cough, or spit, or make a
      noise sometimes, &c. He thinks they laugh or point at him, or do it
      in disgrace of him, circumvent him, contemn him; every man looks at
      him, he is pale, red, sweats for fear and anger, lest some body
      should observe him. He works upon it, and long after this false
      conceit of an abuse troubles him. Montanus*, consil.* 22, gives
      instance in a melancholy Jew, that was *iracundior Adria* [Hor,
      Odes, iii. ix. 23. More stormy than the Adriatic Sea.], so waspish
      and suspicious, *tam facile iratus*, that no man could tell how to
      carry himself in his company."

      [Extract from Part.I. Sect.III. Mem.I. Subs.II,
      'Symptoms in the Mind', from The Anatomy of Melancholy,
      by Robert Burton, publ. London, G. Bell and Sons, Ltd. 1923]

      Every generation has its own translations of non-concrete realities,
      its own ways of rendering apparent the invisible realities of the
      mind.
      Dare I say, in this regard, clinical diagnosis is ... so twentieth
      century? [Tomorrow I meet my new CPN]

      Louise
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