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  • louise
    This is a brave piece of scheduling by Radio 4: a documentary on the cultural impact of LSD, going out on a Saturday afternoon without a hint of patronising
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 2004
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      "This is a brave piece of scheduling by Radio 4: a documentary on
      the cultural impact of LSD, going out on a Saturday afternoon
      without a hint of patronising "don't try this at home" about it.
      Instead, we get highly respected intellectuals like Dr. Susan
      Blackmore on how an acid trip made her decide to get married and why
      she's still convinced that it can be a creative tool for experienced
      users. There are also more comical stories from members of the rock
      band Hawkwind, who used the drug both to help write their music and
      before they went on stage - though I suspect Westlife have never
      believed they were playing to an audience of skeletons.
      Before "outraged of Enfield" picks up his or her pen to write in
      and complain, there is no glorification of the drug and the
      programme makers are clear that it is illegal and potentially
      harmful to certain individuals. For more tolerant listeners,
      though, this is a fascinating step through what William Blake
      famously called "the doors of perception"."
      Jane Anderson radio editor

      Acknowledgments to Radio Times (Yorkshire/NorthEast) 1-7 January
      2005 [www.radiotimes.com]
      This piece is taken from the Choices column, New Years Day.

      The message is a forecast, of what is as yet unclear, to mortal man.

      Louise
      ... seeing her neurons lighten ...
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