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whose on tonight

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  • louise
    I m running out of time again, guys. The Richard Dimbleby lecture is beamed into the room from my left: James Dyson this year, who has pointed out that he is
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 8, 2004
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      I'm running out of time again, guys. The Richard Dimbleby lecture
      is beamed into the room from my left: James Dyson this year, who has
      pointed out that he is the first ever engineer to stand where he
      stands [given the preponderance of arts and performance people,
      including clergy] invited to this and similar opportunities. He
      informed us that it was twenty years ago, when last an industrialist
      was offered this privilege. This is the nature of British
      democracy - riddled through and through with habits so ingrained
      that people either don't notice the disparities or regard them as
      immutable laws of nature purely there as subjects for satirical
      humour. Mr. Dyson is now pointing out that of the ten largest
      international companies, only one - Walmart - is a service company;
      the other nine make big heavy things, like cars. 'The rest of the
      world relies on manufacturing for its wealth ...' - and so he argues
      for common sense and that basic pride in one's own country,
      including the things it makes, against the relentless trend in the
      UK these last couple decades at least, to lop off manufacturing
      capacity as of no account, so long as service industries can for the
      moment replace the jobs. The insanity of trying to make the British
      some kind of exception to the universal laws of survival ...? My
      interpretations here. I'm not used to being quite this political.
      Now he's reviewing the burgeoning of innovation and invention during
      the expansive period of Empire. 'A culture of gifted
      amateurs ...'. He's reached the beginning of the First World War,
      and how we failed to educate our young, at university, as
      successfully as the Germans. On we plough, through the exhaustion
      of two World Wars, and the attendant slough of fatigue, complacency,
      and ropey working conditions. Not to mention the weird prejudice
      against industrial production per se, compared to the more
      respectable trades of farming and commerce. Ah, the GDP fallacy.
      The retailer's margin on the imported Harry Potter figure, etc.
      Enough for now. Goodnight. Louise
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