Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

in response to Bill's enquiries about metric

Expand Messages
  • louise
    First, some simplicities that a man learns, if he works in OPEN, or what can also be called COMPOSITION BY FIELD, as opposed to inherited line, stanza,
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 6, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      First, some simplicities that a man learns, if he works in OPEN, or
      what can also be called COMPOSITION BY FIELD, as opposed to
      inherited line, stanza, over-all form, what is the "old" base of the
      non-projective.
      (1) the *kinetics of the thing. A poem is energy transferred from
      where the poet got it (he will have some several causations), by way
      of the poem itself to, all the way over to, the reader. Okay. Then
      the poem itself must, at all points, be a high-energy construct,
      and, at all points, an energy-discharge. So: how is the poet to
      accomplish same energy, how is he, what is the process by which a
      poet gets in, at all points energy at least the equivalent of the
      energy which propelled him in the first place, yet an energy which
      is peculiar to verse alone and which will be, obviously, also
      different from the energy which the reader, because he is a third
      term, will take away?
      This is the problem which any poet who departs from closed form is
      specially confronted by. And it involves a whole series of new
      recognitions. Form the moment he ventures into FIELD COMPOSITION -
      put himself in the open - he can go by no track other than the one
      the poem under hand declares, for itself. Thus he has to behave,
      and be, instant by instant, aware of some several forces just now
      beginning to be examined. (It is much more, for example, this push,
      than simply such a one as Pound put, so wisely, to get us
      started: "the musical phrase", go by it boys, rather than by, the
      metronome.

      Another extract from the essay PROJECTIVE VERSE.
      I strongly recommend this book I'm copying from,
      'Selected Writings of Charles Olson', Ed. R. Creeley. New Directions.

      Louise
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.