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carnifax

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  • louise
    I ve been looking at the Existential Ethics section of the homepage: http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist/ Seems to me that this passage from F.A. Lea s biography
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2004
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      I've been looking at the Existential Ethics section of the homepage:
      http://www.tameri.com/csw/exist/

      Seems to me that this passage from F.A. Lea's biography of Nietzsche
      (Methuen reprint 1977) throws an interesting crosslight on the
      matters at issue:

      [Nietzsche] could not forgive the Germans for producing Luther, nor
      forgive Luther for either his failure or his success. Where Luther
      failed, he provoked the Counter-Reformation; where he succeeded - he
      succeeded in reinstating precisely that morality of resentment out
      of which Christianity had originally sprung. 'He, the impossible
      monk, repudiated the *rule of the *homines religiosi*; he
      consequently brought about precisely the same thing within the
      ecclesiastical order that he combatted so impatiently in the civic
      order - namely, a "peasant insurrection".
      It was Luther's catastrophic blunder, in Nietzsche's view, instead
      of assailing the ideal of the priest and championing a new type
      of 'higher man', to assail the ideal of the 'higher man' and go on
      championing the priest. 'Every man his own priest' was the
      watchword: and notwithstanding Luther's own (quite illogical)
      attempt to forestall its application to politics, his 'peasant
      insurrection of the spirit' was in fact the precursor of every
      subsequent egalitarian movement, down to the French Revolution.
      Here, once again, however, we must beware of being misled by
      Nietzsche's vehemence. He did not condemn the Reformation, any more
      than he did Christianity, root and branch. He was keenly alive to
      the impetus it had given to rationalism - and therefore to atheism.
      Although, in his view, rationalism was rooted in Catholic
      Christianity, it could never have flowered outside the purlieus of
      Protestantism - and for the rationalism of the Enlightenment, his
      respect was still very great. This, too, he held, might have been
      reconciled with the spontaneity and completeness of the savage.
      This too, in fact, *had been so reconciled - in Goethe. For what
      else made Goethe what he was, 'no mere German, but a European event:
      a magnificent attempt to overcome the eighteenth century through a
      return to nature, through an *ascent to the naturalness of the
      Renaissance, a kind of self-overcoming on the part of the century in
      question'?

      [this quotation from Twilight of the Idols, p109 in the 18-volume
      English Language edition edited by Dr. Oscar Levy]

      Louise
      ... suffering from a mild bout of election day stomach ...
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