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rashes of spam with egg lasagna

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  • louise
    When the war of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve closed, there was a great shrinkage in wool. Peter Cooper sold his holdings for a grocery-store, which he ran just
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 31, 2004
      When the war of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve closed, there was a
      great shrinkage in wool. Peter Cooper sold his holdings for a
      grocery-store, which he ran just long enough to restock and sell to
      a man who wanted it more than he did.
      Then he started a furniture-factory, for he was an expert worker in
      wood.
      But the bench for him was only by-play.
      As he worked, his mind roamed the world.
      He used glue in making the furniture. He bought his glue from a man
      who had a little factory on the site of what is now the Park Avenue
      Hotel.
      The man who made the glue did not like the business. He wanted to
      make furniture, just as comedians always want to play Hamlet. Peter
      Cooper's furniture-shop was in a rented building. The glue man
      owned his site. Peter Cooper traded his furniture-shop for the glue-
      factory, and got a deed to his premises.
      He was then thirty-three years old. The glue-factory was the
      foundation of his fortune. He made better glue and more glue than
      any concern in America. Few men of brains would get stuck on the
      glue business. There are features about it not exactly pleasant.
      The very difficulties of it, however, attracted Cooper. He never
      referred to his glue-factory as a chemical laboratory, nor did he
      call it a studio.
      He was proud of his business. He made the first isinglass
      manufactured in America, and for some years monopolised the trade.
      But one business was not enough for Peter Cooper. Attached to the
      glue-factory was a machine-shop which was the scene of many
      inventions.
      Here in Eighteen Hundred and Twenty-seven and Eighteen Hundred and
      Twenty-eight, Peter Cooper worked out and made a steam-engine, which
      he felt sure was an improvement on the one that Watt had made in
      England.
      Peter Cooper's particular device was a plan to do away with the
      crank, and transform the rectilinear motion of the piston into
      rotary motion. He figured it out that this would save two-fifths of
      the steam, and so stated in his application for a patent, a copy of
      which is before the writer.
      The Patent Office then was looked after by the President in person.
      Peter Cooper's patent was signed by John Quincy Adams, President,
      Henry Clay, Secretary of State, and William Wirt, Attorney General.


      copied from a hand-stitched pamphlet, entitled
      'Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Business Men'
      by Elbert Hubbard. PETER COOPER
      Done into a book by the Roycrofters at their shop which is in East
      Aurora, Erie County, New York. MCMIX
      Single copies 10 cents: the year $1.00

      There - i did the dollar sign, at last.

      Louise
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