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other men's words

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  • louise
    The average educated man, Nietzsche observes, in *Human, All-too- Human*, tends within the first thirty years of his life to recapitulate a whole epoch of
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2004
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      The average educated man, Nietzsche observes, in *Human, All-too-
      Human*, tends within the first thirty years of his life to
      recapitulate a whole epoch of earlier history. Thus, in the
      nineteenth century, he may grow out of traditional Christianity at
      an early age, pass through a phase of enlightenment, and come to
      rest finally in Romanticism - for, after the age of thirty, he is
      usually 'disinclined for new mental turnings'.
      The further progress of culture, however, depends on those with
      sufficient 'elasticity' to go on developing beyond this point - it
      is they who set the standard for the next generation; indeed, if
      they go on long enough, they may actually anticipate the outlook of
      several succeeding generations. 'Men of great elasticity, like
      Goethe, for instance, get through almost more than four generations
      in succession would be capable of; but then they advance too
      quickly, so that the rest of mankind only comes up with them in the
      next century, and even then perhaps not completely.'
      Pre-eminently a man of this type, Nietzsche himself anticipated a
      scepticism that was to come into its own only fifty years after
      *Human, All-too-Human* was published.

      With this extract as sample, I recommend again an approach to
      Nietzsche's work through the existential biography written by F.A.
      Lea, 'The Tragic Philosopher', Methuen reprint 1977.

      Louise
      ... candidly angling for yet another, non-political, new start ...
    • louise
      ... of ... generations ... the
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 20, 2005
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        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
        > The average educated man, Nietzsche observes, in *Human, All-too-
        > Human*, tends within the first thirty years of his life to
        > recapitulate a whole epoch of earlier history. Thus, in the
        > nineteenth century, he may grow out of traditional Christianity at
        > an early age, pass through a phase of enlightenment, and come to
        > rest finally in Romanticism - for, after the age of thirty, he is
        > usually 'disinclined for new mental turnings'.
        > The further progress of culture, however, depends on those with
        > sufficient 'elasticity' to go on developing beyond this point - it
        > is they who set the standard for the next generation; indeed, if
        > they go on long enough, they may actually anticipate the outlook
        of
        > several succeeding generations. 'Men of great elasticity, like
        > Goethe, for instance, get through almost more than four
        generations
        > in succession would be capable of; but then they advance too
        > quickly, so that the rest of mankind only comes up with them in
        the
        > next century, and even then perhaps not completely.'
        > Pre-eminently a man of this type, Nietzsche himself anticipated a
        > scepticism that was to come into its own only fifty years after
        > *Human, All-too-Human* was published.
        >
        > With this extract as sample, I recommend again an approach to
        > Nietzsche's work through the existential biography written by F.A.
        > Lea, 'The Tragic Philosopher', Methuen reprint 1977.
        >
        > Louise
        > ... candidly angling for yet another, non-political, new start ...
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