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Re: toss me a salad or two

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  • louise
    At the time I was typing this post, Paul was waiting to swap places with me, under the terms of our usual agreement. He can have the use of my study and this
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 30, 2004
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      At the time I was typing this post, Paul was waiting to swap places
      with me, under the terms of our usual agreement. He can have the
      use of my study and this computer, if he is willing to do that thing
      which for him is like pulling teeth - switch his own TV (B & O) from
      stimulating games mode to terrestrial bilge availability (not his
      phrase, just his sentiment, he doesn't like the alleged
      contamination, even though it's not him watching the programmes);
      and of course it was channel four news time, hence my inclination to
      do the tv/computer exchange thing. There he was standing behind me
      at 7pm as I was proof-reading and clicking on 'send'. What I
      omitted was the detail that Heidegger's book about Nietzsche's life-
      work comes in four volumes, and this extract was from volume
      three, 'The Will to Power as Knowledge and as Metaphysics'.

      Louise in erratum mode, a tad mechanical, nothing unusual there

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
      > "Truth, conceived as error, was defined as the fixated, the
      > constant. Yet this kind of error necessarily thinks truth in the
      > sense of harmony with the actual, that is, with becoming chaos.
      > Truth as error misses the truth. *Truth misses the *truth. In
      the
      > unequivocal essential definition of truth as error, truth is
      > necessarily thought twice, and each time differently, hence
      > ambiguously: once as fixation of the constant, and then as harmony
      > with the actual. Only on the basis of this essence of truth as
      > harmony can truth as constancy be an error. The essence of truth
      > here underlying the concept of error is what has been determined
      > since ancient times in metaphysical thinking as correspondence
      with
      > the actual and harmony with it, *homoiosis. Harmony need not
      > necessarily be interpreted in the sense of copying and imitating
      > correspondence. When Nietzsche rejects the concept of truth in
      the
      > sense of copying adequation, and rightly so, he need not thus
      > already reject truth in the sense of harmony with the actual."
      >
      > from Chapter 19 (p126), Truth and the Distinction Between "The
      True
      > and Apparent Worlds", in the book, 'Nietzsche', by Martin
      Heidegger.
      > Harper & Row, 1961.
      >
      > transcription by the amateur technologist, louise
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