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Re: Being Alone

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  • louise
    Mary Jo, Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-summer? We got bitten silly ... Never again! I also think I know what you mean, though.
    Message 1 of 9 , May 5 6:36 AM
      Mary Jo,
      Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-summer?
      We got bitten silly ... Never again!
      I also think I know what you mean, though.
      Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the first time
      today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been staring at my
      old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am making no
      headway whatever.
      Louise

      --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
      > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering
      it
      > all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long
      lost,
      > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream, like a
      > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of all
      like
      > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all the
      > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a million
      years
      > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by their
      > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy, even, I felt,
      > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and drowsy
      I
      > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
      >
      > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it shows me that
      > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not only felt
      like
      > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've actually done
      it.
      > When I return to my family from moments like this, I smile and
      kiss
      > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass can be an
      itchy
      > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way you can
      sleep
      > until the little critters make it to your face. We're never really
      > alone in the world for very long.
      >
      > Mary Jo
    • Mary Jo
      Louise, Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always do it up against a tree though, or some variation thereof. I got a kick out of your Lamarckian
      Message 2 of 9 , May 5 7:30 AM
        Louise,

        Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do it" up
        against a tree though, or some variation thereof.

        I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment. Although,
        Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on what role
        consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to know that
        some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us - the "new guy".
        Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our poor genes-
        jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a power trip
        knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point these days.

        Mary Jo

        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
        > Mary Jo,
        > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-summer?
        > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
        > I also think I know what you mean, though.
        > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the first time
        > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been staring at my
        > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am making
        no
        > headway whatever.
        > Louise
        >
        > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
        > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering
        > it
        > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long
        > lost,
        > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream, like a
        > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of all
        > like
        > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all the
        > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a million
        > years
        > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by
        their
        > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy, even, I felt,
        > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and drowsy
        > I
        > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
        > >
        > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it shows me that
        > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not only felt
        > like
        > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've actually done
        > it.
        > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I smile and
        > kiss
        > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass can be an
        > itchy
        > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way you can
        > sleep
        > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're never
        really
        > > alone in the world for very long.
        > >
        > > Mary Jo
      • Mary Jo
        ... Although, ... role ... genes- ... trip ... days. ... summer? ... time ... my ... remembering ... a ... felt, ... drowsy ... that
        Message 3 of 9 , May 5 7:33 AM
          --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
          > Louise,
          >
          > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do it" up
          > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
          >
          > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment.
          Although,
          > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on what
          role
          > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to know that
          > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us - the "new guy".
          > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our poor
          genes-
          > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a power
          trip
          > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point these
          days.
          >
          > Mary Jo
          >
          > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
          > > Mary Jo,
          > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-
          summer?
          > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
          > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
          > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the first
          time
          > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been staring at
          my
          > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am making
          > no
          > > headway whatever.
          > > Louise
          > >
          > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
          > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
          remembering
          > > it
          > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long
          > > lost,
          > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream, like
          a
          > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of all
          > > like
          > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all the
          > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a million
          > > years
          > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by
          > their
          > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy, even, I
          felt,
          > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and
          drowsy
          > > I
          > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
          > > >
          > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it shows me
          that
          > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not only felt
          > > like
          > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've actually done
          > > it.
          > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I smile and
          > > kiss
          > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass can be an
          > > itchy
          > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way you can
          > > sleep
          > > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're never
          > really
          > > > alone in the world for very long.
          > > >
          > > > Mary Jo
        • louise
          Sorry?? Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don t. Summer is worst, bug-wise. Louise ... that ... guy . ... at ... making ... long ... like ...
          Message 4 of 9 , May 5 7:50 AM
            Sorry??
            Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don't.
            Summer is worst, bug-wise.
            Louise
            ... generational confusions vying with jealousies, i suspect ..

            --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
            > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
            > > Louise,
            > >
            > > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do it" up
            > > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
            > >
            > > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment.
            > Although,
            > > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on what
            > role
            > > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to know
            that
            > > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us - the "new
            guy".
            > > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our poor
            > genes-
            > > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a power
            > trip
            > > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point these
            > days.
            > >
            > > Mary Jo
            > >
            > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
            wrote:
            > > > Mary Jo,
            > > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-
            > summer?
            > > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
            > > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
            > > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the first
            > time
            > > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been staring
            at
            > my
            > > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am
            making
            > > no
            > > > headway whatever.
            > > > Louise
            > > >
            > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
            wrote:
            > > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
            > remembering
            > > > it
            > > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar,
            long
            > > > lost,
            > > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream,
            like
            > a
            > > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of
            all
            > > > like
            > > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all
            the
            > > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a
            million
            > > > years
            > > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by
            > > their
            > > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy, even, I
            > felt,
            > > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and
            > drowsy
            > > > I
            > > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
            > > > >
            > > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it shows me
            > that
            > > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not only
            felt
            > > > like
            > > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've actually
            done
            > > > it.
            > > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I smile
            and
            > > > kiss
            > > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass can be
            an
            > > > itchy
            > > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way you
            can
            > > > sleep
            > > > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're never
            > > really
            > > > > alone in the world for very long.
            > > > >
            > > > > Mary Jo
          • Mary Jo
            Louise, simple brain-fart. Autumn is best. Mary Jo ... up ... these ... first ... (by ... me ... be
            Message 5 of 9 , May 5 9:35 AM
              Louise, simple brain-fart. Autumn is best. Mary Jo

              --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
              > Sorry??
              > Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don't.
              > Summer is worst, bug-wise.
              > Louise
              > ... generational confusions vying with jealousies, i suspect ..
              >
              > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
              > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
              > > > Louise,
              > > >
              > > > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do it"
              up
              > > > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
              > > >
              > > > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment.
              > > Although,
              > > > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on what
              > > role
              > > > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to know
              > that
              > > > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us - the "new
              > guy".
              > > > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our poor
              > > genes-
              > > > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a power
              > > trip
              > > > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point
              these
              > > days.
              > > >
              > > > Mary Jo
              > > >
              > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > > > Mary Jo,
              > > > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-
              > > summer?
              > > > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
              > > > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
              > > > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the
              first
              > > time
              > > > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been staring
              > at
              > > my
              > > > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am
              > making
              > > > no
              > > > > headway whatever.
              > > > > Louise
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
              > wrote:
              > > > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
              > > remembering
              > > > > it
              > > > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar,
              > long
              > > > > lost,
              > > > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream,
              > like
              > > a
              > > > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of
              > all
              > > > > like
              > > > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all
              > the
              > > > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a
              > million
              > > > > years
              > > > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify
              (by
              > > > their
              > > > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy, even, I
              > > felt,
              > > > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and
              > > drowsy
              > > > > I
              > > > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
              > > > > >
              > > > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it shows
              me
              > > that
              > > > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not only
              > felt
              > > > > like
              > > > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've actually
              > done
              > > > > it.
              > > > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I smile
              > and
              > > > > kiss
              > > > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass can
              be
              > an
              > > > > itchy
              > > > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way you
              > can
              > > > > sleep
              > > > > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're never
              > > > really
              > > > > > alone in the world for very long.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Mary Jo
            • louise
              Mary Jo, I think for once you have far too much faith in me. I cannot make sense of your metaphor. Could be the generational and experiential thing.
              Message 6 of 9 , May 5 11:29 AM
                Mary Jo,
                I think for once you have far too much faith in me. I cannot make
                sense of your metaphor. Could be the generational and experiential
                thing. Remember you've had a decade or so more living than me;
                remember that you've read and lived through many posts from, for
                instance, Bill, eduard, Lorna, Susan, Chris that I've not even seen
                yet; remember that you've brought up children, and I've had none,
                and know that I have had little contact, as it happens, with my five
                nieces, since the early eighties. I do want friendly relations with
                you. I am not omniscient.
                Autumn was Kierkegaard's preferred season.
                Louise

                --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
                > Louise, simple brain-fart. Autumn is best. Mary Jo
                >
                > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
                wrote:
                > > Sorry??
                > > Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don't.
                > > Summer is worst, bug-wise.
                > > Louise
                > > ... generational confusions vying with jealousies, i suspect ..
                > >
                > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                wrote:
                > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                wrote:
                > > > > Louise,
                > > > >
                > > > > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do
                it"
                > up
                > > > > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
                > > > >
                > > > > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment.
                > > > Although,
                > > > > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on
                what
                > > > role
                > > > > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to
                know
                > > that
                > > > > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us - the "new
                > > guy".
                > > > > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our
                poor
                > > > genes-
                > > > > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a
                power
                > > > trip
                > > > > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point
                > these
                > > > days.
                > > > >
                > > > > Mary Jo
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise"
                <hecubatoher@y...>
                > > wrote:
                > > > > > Mary Jo,
                > > > > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-
                > > > summer?
                > > > > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
                > > > > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
                > > > > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the
                > first
                > > > time
                > > > > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been
                staring
                > > at
                > > > my
                > > > > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and am
                > > making
                > > > > no
                > > > > > headway whatever.
                > > > > > Louise
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo"
                <alcyon11@y...>
                > > wrote:
                > > > > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
                > > > remembering
                > > > > > it
                > > > > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look
                familiar,
                > > long
                > > > > > lost,
                > > > > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old
                dream,
                > > like
                > > > a
                > > > > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most
                of
                > > all
                > > > > > like
                > > > > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and
                all
                > > the
                > > > > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a
                > > million
                > > > > > years
                > > > > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify
                > (by
                > > > > their
                > > > > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy,
                even, I
                > > > felt,
                > > > > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty
                and
                > > > drowsy
                > > > > > I
                > > > > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it
                shows
                > me
                > > > that
                > > > > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not
                only
                > > felt
                > > > > > like
                > > > > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've
                actually
                > > done
                > > > > > it.
                > > > > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I
                smile
                > > and
                > > > > > kiss
                > > > > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass
                can
                > be
                > > an
                > > > > > itchy
                > > > > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way
                you
                > > can
                > > > > > sleep
                > > > > > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're
                never
                > > > > really
                > > > > > > alone in the world for very long.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > Mary Jo
              • Mary Jo
                Louise, There were no metaphors. I try to communicate as directly as possible, because I actually want to make sense and connect with others. My post was
                Message 7 of 9 , May 5 8:11 PM
                  Louise,

                  There were no metaphors. I try to communicate as directly as
                  possible, because I actually want to make sense and 'connect' with
                  others. My post was about an erotic empathy with nature (by way of
                  Jack Kerouac's 'Dharma Bums') and husbands after you brought them up.
                  Thank you for the glowing biography. I don't care about Kierkegaard.
                  If you take me literally things will go more smoothly in our budding
                  friendship. I'm not too old, and you're not too young. I do grow
                  weary of constantly having to reprimand you, my dear. I have enough
                  children presently. Please strive for simple and direct
                  correspondence. There's no need to be mysterious and leading in order
                  to prolong conversation. I'll speak 'with' you if you speak 'with' me.
                  Judging by the amount of time you spend in the archives trying to
                  pour salt into everyone's wounds, you'll eventually figure me out.
                  But I can save you some time. I don't play games. I say what I mean.

                  How about some philosophy rather than personality? Self discipline
                  doesn't hurt. It means we are a disciple of our selves.

                  Mary Jo

                  --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...> wrote:
                  > Mary Jo,
                  > I think for once you have far too much faith in me. I cannot make
                  > sense of your metaphor. Could be the generational and experiential
                  > thing. Remember you've had a decade or so more living than me;
                  > remember that you've read and lived through many posts from, for
                  > instance, Bill, eduard, Lorna, Susan, Chris that I've not even seen
                  > yet; remember that you've brought up children, and I've had none,
                  > and know that I have had little contact, as it happens, with my
                  five
                  > nieces, since the early eighties. I do want friendly relations
                  with
                  > you. I am not omniscient.
                  > Autumn was Kierkegaard's preferred season.
                  > Louise
                  >
                  > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
                  > > Louise, simple brain-fart. Autumn is best. Mary Jo
                  > >
                  > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > Sorry??
                  > > > Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don't.
                  > > > Summer is worst, bug-wise.
                  > > > Louise
                  > > > ... generational confusions vying with jealousies, i suspect ..
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > > > > Louise,
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can always "do
                  > it"
                  > > up
                  > > > > > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism comment.
                  > > > > Although,
                  > > > > > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out on
                  > what
                  > > > > role
                  > > > > > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to
                  > know
                  > > > that
                  > > > > > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us -
                  the "new
                  > > > guy".
                  > > > > > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although our
                  > poor
                  > > > > genes-
                  > > > > > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's a
                  > power
                  > > > > trip
                  > > > > > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute point
                  > > these
                  > > > > days.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Mary Jo
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise"
                  > <hecubatoher@y...>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > Mary Jo,
                  > > > > > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in mid-
                  > > > > summer?
                  > > > > > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
                  > > > > > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
                  > > > > > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for the
                  > > first
                  > > > > time
                  > > > > > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been
                  > staring
                  > > > at
                  > > > > my
                  > > > > > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions, and
                  am
                  > > > making
                  > > > > > no
                  > > > > > > headway whatever.
                  > > > > > > Louise
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo"
                  > <alcyon11@y...>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
                  > > > > remembering
                  > > > > > > it
                  > > > > > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look
                  > familiar,
                  > > > long
                  > > > > > > lost,
                  > > > > > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old
                  > dream,
                  > > > like
                  > > > > a
                  > > > > > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most
                  > of
                  > > > all
                  > > > > > > like
                  > > > > > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and
                  > all
                  > > > the
                  > > > > > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a
                  > > > million
                  > > > > > > years
                  > > > > > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to
                  testify
                  > > (by
                  > > > > > their
                  > > > > > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy,
                  > even, I
                  > > > > felt,
                  > > > > > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty
                  > and
                  > > > > drowsy
                  > > > > > > I
                  > > > > > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." - Kerouac
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it
                  > shows
                  > > me
                  > > > > that
                  > > > > > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not
                  > only
                  > > > felt
                  > > > > > > like
                  > > > > > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've
                  > actually
                  > > > done
                  > > > > > > it.
                  > > > > > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I
                  > smile
                  > > > and
                  > > > > > > kiss
                  > > > > > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the grass
                  > can
                  > > be
                  > > > an
                  > > > > > > itchy
                  > > > > > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That way
                  > you
                  > > > can
                  > > > > > > sleep
                  > > > > > > > until the little critters make it to your face. We're
                  > never
                  > > > > > really
                  > > > > > > > alone in the world for very long.
                  > > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > > Mary Jo
                • louise
                  A few amendments, Mary Jo. I didn t bring up husbands: I mentioned them. It is I who glow, not my, or others biographies. You re never too old. Sorry to hear
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 6 2:23 AM
                    A few amendments, Mary Jo.
                    I didn't bring up husbands: I mentioned them.
                    It is I who glow, not my, or others' biographies.
                    You're never too old.
                    Sorry to hear about this reprimand thing you've picked up.
                    As an admirer of the apostle Paul, I have an antiseptic mind, or at
                    least a penchant thereto, hence the salt - cruelty is an illusion to
                    pseudo-Hindoos.
                    Taking people literally is my study - I keep seeing it end in tears.
                    I prefer Iain Sinclair's Kodak Mantra Diaries (Ginsberg, Olson,
                    London, the works ... to everything I haven't read by Kerouac -
                    which is everything). Don't confuse me with my friends.
                    Apostrophes aren't my thing - they're enforced.
                    The fact that you have no metaphors proves just how wise was your
                    instinct to flee Nooist group at that point in history. With eduard
                    in charge, anyone unequipped with metaphors is playing with snakes.
                    Self-discipline is me metier. Sorry you didn't ... figure??
                    Am now busy playrighting.
                    Your final sentence could not have been written by Servetus.
                    Congratulations! You win a trip to Washington on the 405.
                    Departure times to suit. British is best. Eat. And pause, to love
                    the view, while you can.
                    Arrogantly yours,
                    looks and nooks.

                    --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
                    > Louise,
                    >
                    > There were no metaphors. I try to communicate as directly as
                    > possible, because I actually want to make sense and 'connect' with
                    > others. My post was about an erotic empathy with nature (by way of
                    > Jack Kerouac's 'Dharma Bums') and husbands after you brought them
                    up.
                    > Thank you for the glowing biography. I don't care about
                    Kierkegaard.
                    > If you take me literally things will go more smoothly in our
                    budding
                    > friendship. I'm not too old, and you're not too young. I do grow
                    > weary of constantly having to reprimand you, my dear. I have
                    enough
                    > children presently. Please strive for simple and direct
                    > correspondence. There's no need to be mysterious and leading in
                    order
                    > to prolong conversation. I'll speak 'with' you if you speak 'with'
                    me.
                    > Judging by the amount of time you spend in the archives trying to
                    > pour salt into everyone's wounds, you'll eventually figure me out.
                    > But I can save you some time. I don't play games. I say what I
                    mean.
                    >
                    > How about some philosophy rather than personality? Self discipline
                    > doesn't hurt. It means we are a disciple of our selves.
                    >
                    > Mary Jo
                    >
                    > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > > Mary Jo,
                    > > I think for once you have far too much faith in me. I cannot
                    make
                    > > sense of your metaphor. Could be the generational and
                    experiential
                    > > thing. Remember you've had a decade or so more living than me;
                    > > remember that you've read and lived through many posts from, for
                    > > instance, Bill, eduard, Lorna, Susan, Chris that I've not even
                    seen
                    > > yet; remember that you've brought up children, and I've had
                    none,
                    > > and know that I have had little contact, as it happens, with my
                    > five
                    > > nieces, since the early eighties. I do want friendly relations
                    > with
                    > > you. I am not omniscient.
                    > > Autumn was Kierkegaard's preferred season.
                    > > Louise
                    > >
                    > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > > > Louise, simple brain-fart. Autumn is best. Mary Jo
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise" <hecubatoher@y...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > > Sorry??
                    > > > > Do you like being bitten by mosqitoes, Mary Jo? I don't.
                    > > > > Summer is worst, bug-wise.
                    > > > > Louise
                    > > > > ... generational confusions vying with jealousies, i
                    suspect ..
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo"
                    <alcyon11@y...>
                    > > wrote:
                    > > > > > > Louise,
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Spring and summer is better, bug-wise. You can
                    always "do
                    > > it"
                    > > > up
                    > > > > > > against a tree though, or some variation thereof.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > I got a kick out of your Lamarckian Existentialism
                    comment.
                    > > > > > Although,
                    > > > > > > Darwinians dismiss it out of hand, my vote is still out
                    on
                    > > what
                    > > > > > role
                    > > > > > > consciousness actually plays in adaptation. It's nice to
                    > > know
                    > > > > that
                    > > > > > > some other 'consciousness' freaks lurk amongst us -
                    > the "new
                    > > > > guy".
                    > > > > > > Existentialism is definitely Lamarckian. And although
                    our
                    > > poor
                    > > > > > genes-
                    > > > > > > jeans may have no say in what we do to alter them, it's
                    a
                    > > power
                    > > > > > trip
                    > > > > > > knowing that we can. Lamarck is probably a moot-mute
                    point
                    > > > these
                    > > > > > days.
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > Mary Jo
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "louise"
                    > > <hecubatoher@y...>
                    > > > > wrote:
                    > > > > > > > Mary Jo,
                    > > > > > > > Ever tried doing it in the woods with your husband in
                    mid-
                    > > > > > summer?
                    > > > > > > > We got bitten silly ... Never again!
                    > > > > > > > I also think I know what you mean, though.
                    > > > > > > > Just at present, I'm wondering whether to go out for
                    the
                    > > > first
                    > > > > > time
                    > > > > > > > today - looks as if the rain has stopped. I've been
                    > > staring
                    > > > > at
                    > > > > > my
                    > > > > > > > old notes on Inferno I, and the Dore reproductions,
                    and
                    > am
                    > > > > making
                    > > > > > > no
                    > > > > > > > headway whatever.
                    > > > > > > > Louise
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo"
                    > > <alcyon11@y...>
                    > > > > wrote:
                    > > > > > > > > "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and
                    > > > > > remembering
                    > > > > > > > it
                    > > > > > > > > all. The woods do that to you, they always look
                    > > familiar,
                    > > > > long
                    > > > > > > > lost,
                    > > > > > > > > like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old
                    > > dream,
                    > > > > like
                    > > > > > a
                    > > > > > > > > piece of forgotten song drifting across the water,
                    most
                    > > of
                    > > > > all
                    > > > > > > > like
                    > > > > > > > > golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood
                    and
                    > > all
                    > > > > the
                    > > > > > > > > living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on
                    a
                    > > > > million
                    > > > > > > > years
                    > > > > > > > > ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to
                    > testify
                    > > > (by
                    > > > > > > their
                    > > > > > > > > own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling. Ecstasy,
                    > > even, I
                    > > > > > felt,
                    > > > > > > > > with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling
                    sweaty
                    > > and
                    > > > > > drowsy
                    > > > > > > > I
                    > > > > > > > > felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass." -
                    Kerouac
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > This describes me. It's a spooky similarity, but it
                    > > shows
                    > > > me
                    > > > > > that
                    > > > > > > > > many people can have the "same" experience. I've not
                    > > only
                    > > > > felt
                    > > > > > > > like
                    > > > > > > > > lying down, felt like sleeping and dreaming, I've
                    > > actually
                    > > > > done
                    > > > > > > > it.
                    > > > > > > > > When I return to my family from moments like this, I
                    > > smile
                    > > > > and
                    > > > > > > > kiss
                    > > > > > > > > them with deep and silent passion. Lying on the
                    grass
                    > > can
                    > > > be
                    > > > > an
                    > > > > > > > itchy
                    > > > > > > > > proposition, however. I recommend a blanket. That
                    way
                    > > you
                    > > > > can
                    > > > > > > > sleep
                    > > > > > > > > until the little critters make it to your face.
                    We're
                    > > never
                    > > > > > > really
                    > > > > > > > > alone in the world for very long.
                    > > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > > Mary Jo
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