Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Death with Dignity

Expand Messages
  • Mary Jo
    If one should be coherent enough to make a decision for suicide in old age, why should this be a legal quandry, or even a moral one? Many people having living
    Message 1 of 2 , May 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      If one should be coherent enough to make a decision for suicide in
      old age, why should this be a legal quandry, or even a moral one?
      Many people having living wills, but what if you just didn't get
      around to that little detail? When I was rehabing in Colorado, my
      wonderful therapist came to my home in the mountains. She worked out
      of the hospice center in Evergreen. If I'm recalling correctly, a
      hospice patient could check a box on a form which said they didn't
      want to be revived if their heart stopped. Now this might have
      changed since then, and I know it differs from state to state; but if
      you're already in a critical care situation, why shouldn't you have
      that choice? All the trouble starts if you're in a nursing home,
      hospital or when the kiddies want you to live on in dementia. How
      cruel.

      Bill, I'm too old to commit death by Sportster, but now I'll have a
      sword to fall upon, Roman style. I'll be a fallen warrioress.

      Mary Jo
    • Brian M.
      It s always best to have a friend help with that: I prithee, Strato, stay thou by thy lord. Thou art a fellow of a good respect; Thy life hath had some smatch
      Message 2 of 2 , May 3, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        It's always best to have a friend help with that:

        "I prithee, Strato, stay thou by thy lord.
        Thou art a fellow of a good respect;
        Thy life hath had some smatch of honor in it.
        Hold then my sword, and turn away thy face,
        While I do run upon it. Wilt thou, Strato?"

        The Tragedy of Julius Caesar (Act V. Scene V.)


        -Brian


        --- In existlist@yahoogroups.com, "Mary Jo" <alcyon11@y...> wrote:
        > If one should be coherent enough to make a decision for suicide in
        > old age, why should this be a legal quandry, or even a moral one?
        > Many people having living wills, but what if you just didn't get
        > around to that little detail? When I was rehabing in Colorado, my
        > wonderful therapist came to my home in the mountains. She worked
        out
        > of the hospice center in Evergreen. If I'm recalling correctly, a
        > hospice patient could check a box on a form which said they didn't
        > want to be revived if their heart stopped. Now this might have
        > changed since then, and I know it differs from state to state; but
        if
        > you're already in a critical care situation, why shouldn't you have
        > that choice? All the trouble starts if you're in a nursing home,
        > hospital or when the kiddies want you to live on in dementia. How
        > cruel.
        >
        > Bill, I'm too old to commit death by Sportster, but now I'll have a
        > sword to fall upon, Roman style. I'll be a fallen warrioress.
        >
        > Mary Jo
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.